04 mai 2014

The Adjunct Revolt: How Poor Professors Are Fighting Back

By . Can a budding labor movement improve the lives of non-tenured faculty—and, in the process, fix higher education?
Mary-Faith Cerasoli has been reduced to “sleeping in her car, showering at college athletic centers and applying for food stamps,” The New York Times recently reported. Is she unemployed? No, in fact, she is a college professor— but an adjunct one, meaning she is hired on a short-term contract with no possibility of tenure. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:38 - - Permalien [#]


AG: Kids of those in Va. illegally can pay in-state tuition

By Julian Walker. In his second high-profile deviation from state practice since January, Attorney General Mark Herring has moved to let the offspring of those living in the United States illegally pay in-state tuition at Virginia public colleges and, in the process, bucked a General Assembly that rejected such policy.
With an immigration debate ongoing in Congress, Herring informed state colleges and universities of his determination, then publicly unveiled it Tuesday in two events in Northern Virginia and the state Capitol. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:31 - - Permalien [#]

Higher education spotlighting transfer opportunities

By . The state Higher Education Policy Commission and the Community and Technical College System have shined a light on their effort to streamline the two education systems. A new agreement makes it easier for students to transfer from a two-year school to a four-year school without having to retake classes.
“We just want to make sure students are getting credit for the courses they have taken,” said Sara Tucker, vice-chancellor of the Community and Technical College System. “So they are not having to duplicate their efforts, double their time, or spend money they’ve already spent.”
The CTCS signed onto a memorandum of understanding which was approved by the HEPC last week. More...

The state Higher Education Policy Commission and the Community and Technical College System have shined a light on their effort to streamline the two education systems. A new agreement makes it easier for students to transfer from a two-year school to a four-year school without having to retake classes.

“We just want to make sure students are getting credit for the courses they have taken,” said Sara Tucker, vice-chancellor of the Community and Technical College System. “So they are not having to duplicate their efforts, double their time, or spend money they’ve already spent.”

The CTCS signed onto a memorandum of understanding which was approved by the HEPC last week.

Posté par pcassuto à 16:14 - - Permalien [#]

Stop Worrying About Your Child Getting Into College. Worry About What Happens Next.

The New York TimesBy Maria Kefalas. As a college professor, former admissions officer and researcher on what happens to youths after high school, I believe the current panic over the increasing selectivity of elite schools misses the point. So much energy goes into getting into college. Many families can’t see that getting through college is far more important, and that graduating prepared for adult life will be more valuable than the name arched over the top of the degree. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:51 - - Permalien [#]

California higher education at ‘code red,’ says Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom at Long Beach City College

By Josh Dulaney. Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom sounded an alarm for the future of California’s higher education system Wednesday.
“I think it’s code red of sorts,” Newsom said, prior to participating in a panel discussion at Long Beach City College. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:47 - - Permalien [#]


Time to re-open public debate about ADHD trends, safety implications for college campuses

By Gretchen LeFever Watson. According to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in every 10 American children over the age of three has been diagnosed with ADHD. Before turning 18, nearly 14 percent of children will have been diagnosed. Most will receive ADHD drugs. Fearing that the popular response to this report will be “shock,” Psychiatrist John T. Walkup and two junior colleagues published a “reassuring” commentary that accompanied the CDC report (Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, November 2013). Of concern, the commentary appears to be an attempt to forestall important public debate that has critical safety implications for college and university campuses. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:12 - - Permalien [#]

More students earning college, university credits in high school

By Josh Dehaas. Programs like Advanced Placement grow in Canada.
Philippe Ferland, a first-year student at St. Thomas University (STU) in Fredericton, N.B., remembers his first day on campus in a university course, which he took while still in Grade 12 at Oromocto High School.
“At first I felt apprehensive,” says the Great Books major, “but when I walked into the classroom it felt just like high school—except harder.”
Ferland took introductory Japanese as part of STU’s University Now program, where high-achieving students are invited to take one credit—pretty much any for which they have prerequisites—and apply it to both their high school diplomas and university degrees, at STU or elsewhere, thus lightening their university course load. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:42 - - Permalien [#]

Concordia’s B-school stresses its green credentials

Go to the Globe and Mail homepageBy Jennifer Lewington. Concordia University’s John Molson School of Business has made sustainability a point of differentiation, scoring well on rankings that measure efforts to teach students about the environmental, social and ethical implications of business decisions. Earlier this fall, for example, Molson placed third in Canada in a sustainability survey by Corporate Knights and last year its MBA program ranked 42 nd in the Aspen Institute’s “Beyond Grey Pinstripes” report on the sustainability and social responsibility focus of business schools around the world. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:09 - - Permalien [#]

Report highlights New Jersey's lagging investment in higher education

By Patricia Alex. A report issued on Thursday highlights New Jersey’s lagging investment in higher education, even as legislators – faced with a looming budget shortfall – have warned of the possibility of more cuts to come at the state’s colleges and universities.
New Jersey has cut funding for higher education by 23.5 percent since 2008 when adjusted for inflation, a decrease of more than $2,200 per student, according the report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a think tank that represents liberal views.
These cuts have driven up public tuition and student fees in the state, which now range from $10,000 to more than $13,000 annually. The totals are among the highest in the nation. See more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:02 - - Permalien [#]

NAFSA 2014, Salon institutionnel du 25 au 30 mai 2014

Campus FranceRendez-vous incontournable des échanges et de la coopération universitaire, l'édition 2014 de NAFSA à San Diego (Californie, Etats-Unis) confirme la position dominante et privilégiée de cette enceinte au niveau mondial: 37 pavillons internationaux, une centaine de pays représentés, 430 stands individuels et près de 9000 visiteurs annoncés, soit la fréquentation la plus importante depuis Washington en 2008. Cette manifestation professionnelle est également l'occasion de rencontrer en nombre les "study abroad advisers" américains. Voir l'article...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:34 - - Permalien [#]