24 septembre 2018

President announces further boost to national research

By Kudzai Mashininga. Zimbabwe’s new president has announced that his government will enact a law establishing a research institute that will contribute towards the economic growth that will turn the country into a middle-income nation by 2030. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:35 - - Permalien [#]


Partnership aims to produce problem-solving graduates

By Esther Nakkazi. A four-year partnership aimed at helping universities to produce graduates who have the skills and competencies that local employers and communities need to solve real-world problems was recently launched in four universities in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:34 - - Permalien [#]

Pan African University launches research policy

By Maina Waruru. The Pan African University (PAU) has published it first Research and Publication Policy, a document that, once approved by its governing council, will guide how the continental university will conduct and publish research – a critical component of its function as a postgraduate training and research network of African universities. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:33 - - Permalien [#]

African universities need to develop their own robust knowledge of China

By Sharon Dell – Editor. In Africa Analysis, Ross Anthony argues that with increasing support from China for African universities, the continent’s academic leaders need to understand the possible wider effects of China’s lack of academic freedom in terms of their own future policies.
   In Africa Features, Wagdy Sawahel looks at challenges facing the Sudanese government in implementing its new five-year policy to empower students with disabilities, and Edwin Naidu reports on a Johannesburg symposium for university collaboration in a £20 million UK initiative to strengthen academic partnerships and initiatives.
   In News from around the continent, Maina Waruru reports on the Pan African University’s new draft policy document that aims to guide how the continental university will conduct and publish research; Esther Nakkazi writes about a new partnership in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania that will help thousands of graduates to play a dynamic role in solving real-world problems; and Gilbert Nganga reports on a new directive which will see career offices set up in all Kenyan universities by the year end.
   In our World Blog this week, Philip G Altbach and Hans de Wit respond to a commentary in last week’s edition, saying they do not advocate that knowledge production be concentrated in rich countries but rather that it be concentrated in research universities in all countries.
   This is my final Africa edition as editor. Next month, it will be in the capable hands of our new editor Fiona Crooks. I would like to take this opportunity to wish her well in the position. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:30 - - Permalien [#]

As Chinese largesse in HE increases, African countries need their own China experts

By Brendan O’Malley – Managing Editor. In Commentary, Ross Anthony says while Chinese investments in African higher education should be welcomed, countries need to develop their own expertise on China to help preserve academic freedom amid concern over a growing culture of academic censorship in China. Anand Kulkarni examines the 2018 Global Innovation Index, noting there is little movement in the top echelons, but further down the field other countries are rising up in the ranks, particularly China and to a lesser extent India. Rowell D Madula outlines a study of internationalisation at two universities in the Philippines which, he argues, shows there is a way to develop internationalisation without compromising national identity. Marcelo S Perlin, Takeyoshi Imasato and Denis Borenstein outline their research showing the alarming rise of predatory journals in the Brazilian academic system in the hope of helping to combat this scourge in academia. And Damtew Teferra says the first step towards addressing the fraud and malpractice that is threatening the academic enterprise in Africa is recognising its nature and scope.
   In our World Blog this week, Philip G Altbach and Hans de Wit respond to a commentary in last week’s edition, saying they do not advocate that knowledge production be concentrated in rich countries but rather that it be concentrated in research universities in all countries.
   In Features, Aimee Chung reports on media investigations into university researchers in South Korea using academically questionable conferences to lift their research profiles. Brendan O’Malley unpicks a new report which says targeted free tuition is becoming an increasingly popular choice for governments across the world as a viable alternative to blanket free higher education or a progressive student loan system. And Mary Beth Marklein highlights a critical current concern of university leaders in the United States – creating a campus environment where diverse perspectives can come together to address the nation’s social problems. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:29 - - Permalien [#]


Network Learning Environments

Network Learning Environments
George Siemens also cites this item, which reacts to Jay Cross's Connections: The Impact Of Schooling. It's like he's reading Cross for the first time: "It's nice to see an article... finally start to create an awareness of the importance of networks both literally and as a design metaphor for learning." What does he mean, finally. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:04 - - Permalien [#]

Universities - The New Context

Universities - The New Context
George Siemens cites this item in his newsletter today. Simply: "Universities in Canada today are booming as a result of the double cohort. But after the boom will come the bust." What follows is an informed series of observations, characterized as 'revolutions' leading to an undeniable reality. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:03 - - Permalien [#]

Adobe Opens E-book Store

Adobe Opens E-book Store
Adobe has opened an e-book store, offering selections from major publishers such as HarperCollins Publishers, Simon & Schuster and Random House along with electronic versions of publications such as Popular Science and The New York Times. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:03 - - Permalien [#]

Bush Reiterates Class Size Problems

Bush Reiterates Class Size Problems
The other day I discussed the issue of schools' investing in technology at the expense of teacher salaries. Here's a similar dilemma: investing in classrooms at the expense of teacher salaries. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:02 - Permalien [#]

Big Time Publishing Fun With Metadata

Big Time Publishing Fun With Metadata
It is by their own admission a primitive application of the semantic web, but where Harper's is heading is definitely in the right direction. Expore this item, and imagine it listing the contents not of one but of 100 selected publications. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:01 - - Permalien [#]