14 février 2020

Cool URIs for the Semantic Web

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Cool URIs for the Semantic Web
Some of this W3C doment discussion seems to be echoing some of the discussion about open social networks. It's nigh well time. "RDF allows the users to describe Web documents and resources from the real world-people, organisations, things-in a computer-processable way. Publishing such descriptions on the Web creates the Semantic Web. URIs (Uniform Resource Identifiers) are very important". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:11 - - Permalien [#]


An Excerpt of Radio Lab's Morality Episode

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. An Excerpt of Radio Lab's Morality Episode
Dave Pollard links to WNYC (I haven't listened to it yet) and enthuses, "Listen to Season One's program on Emergence -- about how self-managed groups do very, very well without leaders. Instead, they self-adopt models, consensually. Order materializing out of disorder, chaos. This is our job: To allow to emerge collective models of better ways to live and make a living, working collaboratively with those we love in conversation and community, and then allow them to be adopted." In a complex society it may be more important to learn how to work collaboratively with those we are indifferent to, but the overall point is correct: collaboration isn't about leading, it's about modeling. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:10 - - Permalien [#]

A Differently Moral-Ed Generation

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. A Differently Moral-Ed Generation
Doug Johnson cites Ian Jukes who copies a New York Times article by David Pogue suggesting that kids today are 'diferently moral'. In my response I suggests that it is the nature of 'morality' - or, at least, what some publishers would like us to believe is morality - that is changing. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:09 - - Permalien [#]

Blogs Celebrate 10th Anniversary

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Blogs Celebrate 10th Anniversary
Fun listen from NPR skipping through a history of blogging. I liked the effect of using echo text to indicate hyperlinks and sped-up audio to indicate scrolling. Accompanied with an essay by Any Carvin offering an Americanized (Pew study) look at blogger demographics. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:09 - - Permalien [#]

The 15 Biggest Tech Disappointments of 2007

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The 15 Biggest Tech Disappointments of 2007
PC World has run a number of year-end lists. Most of them haven't been worth reading, but this list was exactly right, capturing the many disappointments internet service providers and software companies have dished up this year. The biggest disappointment? Aw. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:08 - - Permalien [#]


20 Trends Defining Virtual Worlds in 2007

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. 20 Trends Defining Virtual Worlds in 2007
Good summary discussing trends in the world of virtual worlds. Biggest take-home: "Us geeks talk about Second Life like it's the be-all and end-all of virtuality, but the kiddyworlds have way more active users. More importantly, a whole generation of children are growing up with the sense that virtual worlds are just a part of their lives - they don't even refer to them as virtual worlds". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:08 - - Permalien [#]

An Explanation of the Citizendium License

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. An Explanation of the Citizendium License
I actually ran a word count to verify that Larry Sanger spent 22,000 words (it's actually more like 22,300) explaining why Citizendium adopted the CC-By-SA license (instead of, say, the non-commercial CC-By-NC-SA license). I can summarize the argument in a dozen words: so much of Citizendium comes from Wikipedia, it's much easier to use the license Wikipedia is now using. Of some interest is the section discussing the arguments in favour of a non-commercial license with an interesting bit on how the non-commercial license can be 'less free' than CC-By-SA and yet still 'free'. There is no indication that Sanger has seen my own argument, which is essentially (in this context) the assertion that CC-By-NC-SA is more free because it means access to the content is never blocked. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:07 - - Permalien [#]

What the Heck Is a PLE and Why Would I Want One?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. What the Heck Is a PLE and Why Would I Want One?
Presentation (slides and audio running about 10 minutes) by Alan J. Cann from the University of Leicester. Good overview of the concept. What I like is the contrast between the VLE and the PLE with an emphasis on the idea that the former is 'control' learning while the latter is 'free' learning. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:07 - - Permalien [#]

Top 5 Blog Posts I'Ve Read in 2007

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Top 5 Blog Posts I'Ve Read in 2007
These are totally not the five posts I would choose for the year, but that says more about differences in taste and perspective than it does about the quality of the posts. Many people would prefer Dean Shareski's selections over mine, I'm sure. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:06 - - Permalien [#]

Revisiting Content Is Not King. Connectivity Is Priority.

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Revisiting Content Is Not King. Connectivity Is Priority.
I get what Leigh Blackall is saying in this post, but even with full connectivity content would not be 'king' - at least, not the sort of content that is ordinarily supposed hen we talk of things like learning objects (or newspaper articles). The point is, more learning happens through conversation and content creation than by mere passive receptivity. And what Illich (and Friere, and others, know) is that when you take control of the production of your own learning, you give yourself the power to learn, which is something no content provider can even give to you. Broadband connectivity helps, to be sure - but the important part of the broadband connection is the ploading part. After all, we've had broadband downloading for a very long time. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:06 - - Permalien [#]