15 décembre 2013

Russian universities benefit from private funding bonanza

By . Russian big business has significantly ramped up the amount of money it is putting into national universities in recent years, according to the presidents of Russia’s top universities. This chimes with a recent Times Higher Education analysis, which placed Russian universities in 11th place, in terms of money secured from industry per academic. That survey found that the Russian academics secured $36,400 (£22,300) per researcher, up from $25,000 in 2009. 
Private investment at the Moscow State University (MSU) has doubled since 2009 and now accounts for about 25% of the university’s RUB19 billion (£352 million) budget. The same trend can be seen at the Higher School of Economics, Russia's most prestigious economics university. Currently the School of Economics’ annual private donations are in the range of RUB1–1.5 billion – around 10% of total funding – and continuing to grow. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:29 - - Permalien [#]


New Nobel laureate Randy Schekman hits out at academic publishers over their publication of only the 'flashiest' research

The IndependentBy Oliver Wright. For years scientists have vied to have their research published in the most renowned peer-reviewed journals – with acceptance a guarantee of prestige and a crucial factor in influencing future funding and academic support for their work. 
But now a Nobel Prize-winning biologist has accused some of the best known academic publishers of distorting the scientific process by promoting only the “flashiest” research in order to increase subscriptions. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:26 - - Permalien [#]

Supporting doctoral education in Africa – A sketch of what is available

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Jonathan Harle. The need to increase Africa’s stock of PhD-qualified staff has featured prominently in many discussions and reports in recent years – and not solely in university circles, with national dailies picking up the story in Kenya and Nigeria. It is part of a broader concern with securing the ‘next generation’ of academics, a critical foundation for universities, and something on which their future teaching and research strength will depend. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:53 - - Permalien [#]

Emerging ideas for building PhD training capacity

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Karen MacGregor. The Southern African Regional Universities Association, SARUA, is exploring ways to build supervision capacity through collaboration and drawing on strengths of universities across the region. One emerging ‘hub and spoke’ model would connect research-intensive institutions with others that are more teaching-oriented to share resources and facilities for PhD training. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:52 - - Permalien [#]

Understanding the demands of PhD production

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Karen MacGregor. There are multiple factors holding back PhD production in Africa including low participation and graduation rates, an absence of enabling organisational conditions, lack of funding, deficient resources and infrastructure, a limited research agenda and poor productivity. The enormous challenges facing African universities were outlined in a document prepared for a recent workshop by Professor Johann Mouton, director of the Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science and Technology (CREST) and Dr Nico Cloete, director of the Centre for Higher Education Transformation (CHET). Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:50 - - Permalien [#]


Brazil’s doctoral production lessons for Africa

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Karen MacGregor. The remarkable achievements of Brazil in PhD training – from 800 to 12,000 doctorates a year in three decades – could provide a model for African countries trying to expand doctoral production. Crucial factors in Brazil were support from the academic community, evaluation “with consequences”, funding and political commitment. This is according to Professor Renato Janine Ribeiro, a professor of ethnics and political philosophy at the University of São Paulo and former evaluation director at CAPES – the Federal Agency for the Support and Evaluation of Graduate Education. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:49 - - Permalien [#]

Opening doors for international students

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Greg Nance. The university is an institution for critical inquiry and learning that has spearheaded scientific discovery and innovation, amplifying economic growth and societal advancement. The ever-accelerating pace of globalisation and the growing connectedness and interdependence of different cultures and national economies make the university’s role all the more important. Enrolment of international students helps foster this learning revolution. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:46 - - Permalien [#]

Graduate education in the UK – The postgraduate puzzle

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Elizabeth Bell. Graduate education in the UK has long been seen as a peripheral issue. Over the past 25 years, successive governments have focused their efforts on reforms to undergraduate education. Postgraduate education has often been an afterthought, or not even a thought at all. Many commentators have levelled criticisms at the recent Browne review, which devoted just a single page to the issue in its 60-page report, and concluded that: “Postgraduate Education is a successful part of the higher education system and there is no evidence that changes to funding or student finance are needed to support student demand or access.” Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:44 - - Permalien [#]

The rise of industrial PhDs

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Martina Ori. Recent social, economic and cultural changes brought about by the knowledge revolution have called into question the traditional role and function of higher education institutions. The ‘knowledge economy’ increasingly requires the acquisition of specific skills on the part of graduates to compete in knowledge-intensive labour markets. Policy emphasis, exacerbated by the current economic crisis and high unemployment rates in many Western countries, has been placed on the need for closer cooperation between education and the labour market. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:42 - - Permalien [#]

International agents – Reducing the risks

http://enews.ksu.edu.sa/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/UWN.jpgBy Deian Hopkin. The financial landscape of British universities is changing rapidly as the state retreats from directly funding universities and the contribution of individual students becomes the primary source of tuition fee income. Even in Wales and Scotland, where the government continues to subsidise tuition fees, questions are being asked about long-term sustainability. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:41 - - Permalien [#]