14 février 2020

SPS Partnering with Connexions for Open-Access Educational Repository

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. SPS Partnering with Connexions for Open-Access Educational Repository
This is a good announcement: "IEEE is partnering with open-access educational repository Connexions on a major initiative to develop a critical mass of signal processing educational modules and courses that will be available for free access by anyone, anywhere, at any time." And I hope some of that open content goodness rubs off on IEEE, which is known in these parts mostly for being a real pain to deal with when it comes to copyright. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:31 - - Permalien [#]


Wrapping the Intro to Open Ed Class

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Wrapping the Intro to Open Ed Class
David Wiley's Intro to Open Education course is wrapping up; in this post he links to a closing slide show (using Google Docs) created by a group of his Italian students. The course demonstrates best a dictum I'm sure Wiley knows well, that the greatest influence in a society is through education. For myself, I was interested to watch as he tried to find a balance between his paying students and his non-paying students. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:13 - - Permalien [#]

Federating Social Networks: Open-Source Project in the Making

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Federating Social Networks: Open-Source Project in the Making
The core of the post is here: "Pulling RSS feeds every 30 minutes is not going to cut it, ever. We need something that pushes, and XMPP is the way to do it." Well, is this true? It depends. If you want something real-time, like instant messaging, then you need something (selective) that pushes. Like, well, instant messaging. Like Twitter, for that matter. But if it's not time-sensitive, then you don't want to be bothered or interrupted by it. This is when pull works. Like, well, RSS. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:03 - - Permalien [#]

12 février 2020

Irreconcilable Differences Over the Definition of Open

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Irreconcilable Differences Over the Definition of Open
Hoffman writes, "People working from the first principles of the free software movement or the definition of open source software, like me, will never accept non-commercial licensing as 'free' or 'open,' because it limits the use and redistribution of the work." No it doesn't. They can use and redistribute the work all they want. The one thing they cannot do is block access to it by charging for it. That said - yes, this may be a schism, because the commercial lobby is powerful and pervasive and wants desperately to monetize that which it does not own. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:28 - - Permalien [#]

Ottawa Opens Up Wireless Industry to More Competition

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Ottawa Opens Up Wireless Industry to More Competition
What we know is that the big three (Bell, Telus and Rogers) have combined to give Canada some of the highest wireless rates around, which is why more than a third of us do not even today use mobile phones. So although I agree that opening part of the spectrum to other parties does not "guarantee" lower prices, I don't see how it could hurt, and I could certainly imagine how it could help. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:30 - - Permalien [#]


The Cape Town Open Education Declaration

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Cape Town Open Education Declaration
I know the people behind this declaration mean well, and the signatories include people I know and respect - but I can't, you know, sign on to this version of open education, a version that is institution-centered, teacher-centered, and commercial. We can't pay for the schools and teachers we have now (and the teachers we're educating can't pay for their students loans on their salaries), do we want that to be the model of learning we give to the rest of the world. And goodness, the internet is already awash with really vile and intrusive commercial activity, do we have to export it too? We have the opportunity to do something really special in the world; why do we have to carve into every declaration of principle a paean to Things As They Are (and Those Who Profit From Them). More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:23 - - Permalien [#]

03 février 2020

Open Ed - Week 11: OERs Vs Learning Objects

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Open Ed - Week 11: OERs Vs Learning Objects
I meant to use this chart, comparing old-style learning objects with new-style open learning resources, in my talk today. But I forgot (not that there would have been time for it). But it is instructive, and a useful addendum. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:16 - - Permalien [#]

31 janvier 2020

Claroline Open Source LMS Wins UNESCO Award

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Claroline Open Source LMS Wins UNESCO Award
Honestly, I had never heard of Claroline before this, an open source PHP-based learning management system. But I'm with Mark Aberdour when he ponders, "We're not sure where Moodle was in all this, used by many thousands of institutions in 195 countries and localised into 74 languages, maybe no-one nominated them." I really think that the people in these international bodies should get out more. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:24 - - Permalien [#]

OpenLearn2007 Conference October 2007

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. OpenLearn2007 Conference October 2007
Nice use of Yahoo Pipes to collect and display blog posts covering the OpenLearn conference. One of the features of Pipes that I like, and that I use in edu_RSS, which makes you almost impervious to spam, is to aggregate content from a selected list of feeds, and not the entire world. You can, if you want, open things up to the wider world by aggregating a del.icio.us feed (the OpenLearn feed doesn't do this). More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:42 - - Permalien [#]

Coase's University: Open Source, Economics, and Higher Education

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Coase's University: Open Source, Economics, and Higher Education
Michael Feldstein interprets open source through the lens of economic theory. It's a nice paper, and this sentence caught my eye: "We typically reduce all of economics to supply and demand, but it could be equally well formulated in terms of cost and benefit. Every system of production, whether it is a company, a market, or an open source community, has its costs." That's a good point, and of ourse, the economic advantage of open source is that it lowers costs. But that got me thinking: supply-demand, cost-benefit... could there be other pairs of variables that explain economics equally well, if not better? Economics is, at heart, the science of the trade-off. How about, then, pairs like desire and dislike? Hope and fear? Because, after all, the driving force of the economy might not be money at all. It might be something more intangible, like love or fear. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:41 - - Permalien [#]