06 mai 2019

Learning Development Cycle: Bridging Learning Design and Modern Knowledge Needs

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Learning Development Cycle: Bridging Learning Design and Modern Knowledge Needs
George Siemens weighs in with another significant paper. Starting with the premise, established elsewhere, that "learning today has moved beyond courses," he outlines a model of four distinct learning domains: accretion, transmission, acquisition and emergence. Each demands a different sort of learning (not 'instructional design') and Siemens accordingly offers a learning development cycle that takes this into account. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:57 - - Permalien [#]


« Les écoles de design sont les instituts d’études politiques de demain! »

http://orientation.blog.lemonde.fr/files/2011/08/Edhec-Olivier-Rollot-208x300.jpgBlog "Il y a une vie après le bac" d'Olivier Rollot. Nous formons des jeunes connectés à une réalité économique qu’on ne maîtrise pas. Nous avons une haute idée du design comme une discipline mure. Les designers ont vocation à occuper de hautes responsabilités. Plus...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:12 - - Permalien [#]

05 mai 2019

When Design Thinking Sessions Are Good, They Are Wicked Good

By Joshua Kim. How a little bit of design thinking knowledge is a dangerous thing.
How many “design thinking” sessions have you participated in over the past few years. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:35 - - Permalien [#]

04 mai 2019

Design thinking : la nouvelle méthodologie en vue à l’école

l'emag de l'educationA Canopé, nous parlons plutôt de co-design. C’est une méthodologie qu’on expérimente depuis deux ans dans le champ de l’éducation, mais qui est commune, sur la forme, à diverses disciplines. Plus...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:31 - - Permalien [#]

30 avril 2019

Smith, Ragan: Instructional Design, Third Edition

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Smith, Ragan: Instructional Design, Third Edition
McToonish points to this online support site for a textbook, Smith and Ragan's Instructional Design, Third Edition. Normally I am sceptical about such sites, and about instructional sdesign texts in particular, but the full set of presentations and illustrations from the book alone make a visit worth while. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:05 - - Permalien [#]


18 avril 2019

3 Keys to Engaging Faculty in Instructional Design

Techno-News BlogMost instructional designers will tell you their work begins with getting a foot in the door with faculty and building rapport from there. Here are three ways to make that relationship a success. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:34 - - Permalien [#]

09 avril 2019

The Role of Metaphor in Interaction Design

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Role of Metaphor in Interaction Design
I think metaphor is the foundation of human reason (more accurately, I think similarity is the foundation of human reason). So it should be no surprise that I would be interested in Dan Saffer's essay on the role of metaphor in interaction design. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:32 - - Permalien [#]

04 avril 2019

Are the Basics of Instructional Design Changing?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Are the Basics of Instructional Design Changing?
Following what I thought was an interesting turn of discussion on ITForum (aggregated here) I wrote this item, first, to underscore the role of philosophy as informing educational theory, and second, to highlight the difference between online learning and 'traditional' distance education. I argue that the theory of distributed representation has a profound implication for pedagogy, as it suggests that learning (and teaching, such as it is) is not a process of communication, but rather, a process of immersion. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:08 - - Permalien [#]

27 mars 2019

Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines
PDF. James Paul Gee asks, "How do good game designers manage to get new players to learn long, complex, and difficult games?" Here's how (quoted from the text):
- Learners feel like active agents (producers) not just passive recipients (consumers).
- Different styles of learning work better for different people.
- People take on a new identity they value and in which they become heavily invested.
- They can manipulate powerful tools in intricate ways that extend their area of effectiveness.
- Early problems are designed to lead players to form good guesses about how to proceed when they face harder problems later on.
- Challenges feel hard, but doable. Learners feel - and get evidence - that their effort is paying off.
- Repeated cycles of learners practicing skills until they are nearly automatic, then having those skills fail in ways that cause the learners to have to think again and learn anew.
- Give verbal information just in time and on demand
- Create simplified systems, stressing a few key variables and their interactions.
- Risks and dangers greatly mitigated (one of the worst problems with school: it's too risky and punishing).
- See the skills first and foremost as a strategy for accomplishing a goal and only secondarily as a set of discrete skills.
- People learn skills, strategies, and ideas best when they see how they fit into an overall larger system to which they give meaning.
- Make the meanings of words and concepts clear through experiences the player has and activities the player carries out. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:27 - - Permalien [#]

Five Lenses: Towards a Toolkit for Interaction Design

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Five Lenses: Towards a Toolkit for Interaction Design
This is a very nice paper that cuts through some of the issues I have felt (but never really discussed) in learning theory. Two major things. The first is the recognition that interaction theory (and by extension, learning theory), can be viewed from five distinct points of view: the cognitive, the anthropological, the artifacts, the social and the ecological. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:12 - - Permalien [#]