11 octobre 2019

eLearning Watch

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. eLearning Watch
This newsletter comes out once a month, and though it has been running since 2005, has previously escaped my notice - perhaps because it only comes out once a month. For people involved in the field, most of the monthly links will be date, but the frequency is good for people who want to keep up but who don't want to spend a lot of time doing it. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:52 - - Permalien [#]


Experts: Ed Tech Must Change Its Message

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Experts: Ed Tech Must Change Its Message
Supporters of educational technology need to change their message when talking with stakeholders, and they need to advocate more forcefully for change in higher education." This according to Past Board members of the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN). The change, according to the article, is that educators should "shift the focus in the national dialogue about educational technology from the technology itself to the changes it enables in teaching and learning". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:51 - - Permalien [#]

Learning by Design: Good Video Games As Learning Machines

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Learning by Design: Good Video Games As Learning Machines
I don't know whether this was written for Education Gazette or whether it's just a link, but it's a good article. James Paul Gee writes, "the designers of many good games have hit on profoundly good methods of getting people to learn and to enjoy learning." Quite so. That's why I spent 12 hours this weekend playing Civ and only one hour reading philosophy. This article lists thirteen 'principles', though you draw your own theme from the list. Games engage students by having them co-create, by having them build and do things, by allowing them to customize, and by letting them invest in an identity over time. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:50 - - Permalien [#]

Java Programmers Aren't Born

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Java Programmers Aren't Born
How do you become an excellent Java programmer? You start young, you program for free, you get your education, and you eat, sleep and live Java. "Let's say, for example, that your official work day starts at 8:30, and ends at 17:00. It is what happens after those hours, that will determine your future as a programmer. i.e. what are you doing between 6:00 and 8:00, before you set off for work? You could be programming in Java." Now of course, I would never recommend that you study Java if you love programming. But that's just me. What I will say is that the author is right. It takes that kind of dedication to learn to program well - to learn to do anything well. Me, I started to program too late in life, at about 18. But writing and philosophy, I've been doing those, well, forever. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:50 - - Permalien [#]

Could Do Better: A Checklist for Participatory Communication for Development

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Could Do Better: A Checklist for Participatory Communication for Development.
Probing questions, a list of dimensions of 'participatory communications' from G.A. Dragon, and even a citation from Illich's To Hell With Good Intentions: "By definition, you cannot help being ultimately vacationing salesmen for the middle-class 'American Way of Life,' since that is really the only life you know." Well, yeah, and I can't help being anything other than an opinionated Canadian with a healthy disrespect for power and control. And the Finns I've seen carry their Finnishness with them, and the Brits their Britishness, and so on. So what do we do when we reach out to another culture? I had to find my own way teaching in First Nations communities. And the main thing I decided was to not try to be something other than what I am. The place where I draw the line is in trying to make other people into images of me (though I have to say, it's really tempting). They have to find their own way - and me, well I'll just be maximally me and they can take whatever they want from that, or nothing, if that's what they want. But I'm not going to pull back, to be less of who I am. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:49 - - Permalien [#]


Bfree - Export Courses From Blackboard

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Bfree - Export Courses From Blackboard
Scott Leslie points to this product that lets you extract courses from a Blackboard archive file. "It allows you to open a Blackboard course export or archive file, select the files you want and then export these as an independent website". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:49 - - Permalien [#]

Setting up your first assignment face-to-face in class using Peergrade

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Setting up your first assignment face-to-face in class using Peergrade
W. Ian O'Byrne, YouTube, 2019/02/12
As the caption to this 7 minute video says, this is "a quick overview of how I use Peergrade as an activity in class to work through the process and expectations of peer evaluation and assessment." He outlines an exercise using a video on digital literacy; after watching the video, they use the application in class, and tghen use PeerGrade to write some quick responses. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:48 - - Permalien [#]

Review: The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics and the Future of Work

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Review: The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics and the Future of Work by Richard Baldwin
Brian Castellani, Sociology and Complexity Science Blog, 2019/02/12
There are two major points being made hewre. The first is the oft-heard observation that "a new form of globalization will combine with software robots to disrupt service-sector and professional jobs." Second, and more significantly, "the current backlash against our global commitments to one another, particularly across western society, has very much to do with the failure of public policy to adequately address the negative impact that post-industrialization and globalisation have had on the working and middle classes". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:47 - - Permalien [#]

A Framework for Modern Workplace Learning 2019

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. A Framework for Modern Workplace Learning 2019
Jane Hart, Modern Workplace Learning, 2019/02/12
This is chapter 1 of a longer work (you'll have to pay for subsequent chapters, and they're not written yet) and a good introduction to the topic of modern workplace learning. The linchpin is the new framework (presented in a frustratingly small diagram; a big version would help tired old eyes like mine) where "everyone is responsible for their own continuous improvement, learning and development." In particular, Hart envisions a new role, "Modern Learning Advisors," who "enable and support learningby (a) helping individuals build modern learning skills, organize & manage their own self-development, and (b) helping managers and their teams get the most out of daily work experiences". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:46 - - Permalien [#]

How Canada’s Philanthropic Pop Industrial Complex Took Over The World

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. How Canada’s Philanthropic Pop Industrial Complex Took Over The World
Ben Paynter, Fast Company, 2019/02/12
The most misleading word in this headline is "philanthropic". Our investment in music isn't charity. The story talks about government support for Canadian music, and even makes it clear that the funding program (through organizations like the Canada Music Fund and FACTOR) "wasn’t altruism... You need variety and good quality." Government investment not only creates success, it protects artists. “When the record breaks, they aren’t walking around L.A. signing (bad) record and management deals because that’s all they got.” Why is this important? Because we should be doing the same thing for open educational resources. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:45 - - Permalien [#]