07 octobre 2019

Can the $100 Laptop Change the World?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Can the $100 Laptop Change the World?
The answer suggested by this article is "yes" and I am inclined to agree. As George Siemens notes, the first paragraph tells the story. "What if every child in the world could have a free personal laptop? Put some e-books on it, make it Web-capable, and add a palette of media tools so children could work on creative projects. Wouldn't that be incredible?" Yes it would. But there's a lot more to this story. Like, for example, how the development work proceeded. "These academicians have ideas and they aren't afraid to use them. One is that we learn by creating. Another is that education is a community-based effort and hierarchical institutions get in the way." Makes me realize that my own research organization has procedures in place to make sure something like this never happens. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:57 - - Permalien [#]


Quick Guide to New USAToday.Com Features

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Quick Guide to New USAToday.Com Features
Interesting. USA Today has redesigned their website to embrace Web 2.0 features wholeheartedly. Is the world ready for a USA Today Social Network? As Scott Karp reports, the first reviews from readers have been negative. Very negative. But I wonder. The first complaint is from a person looking for the commodity prices. This must be the only person in the world getting their commodity prices from USA Today. That doesn't mean they're totally off-base. The front page is too busy. But what do you make of this comment. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:56 - - Permalien [#]

What Is Web 2.0? Ideas, Technologies and Implications for Education

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. What Is Web 2.0? Ideas, Technologies and Implications for Education
This is a very good report capturing some of the main ideas behind Web 2.0 and looking into some of the implications. If you are new to Web 2.0, this is an excellent introduction. The author depicts Web 2.0 not simply as a new set of technologies but also as the emergence of six major ideas: individual production and user generated content, harness the power of the crowd, data on an epic scale, architecture of participation, network effects, and openness. The author gets into the details quite well - there is, for example, a nice outline of AJAX, an informed discussion of SOAP vs REST, and a good sketch of the issues between Web 2.0 and the Semantic Web. At other times, though, the document reads as though written by an outsider - it depends too much on formal sources and people like Tim O'Reilly and Chris Anderson and John Seely Brown. And it addresses teaching and learning in just over a page, while devoting almost ten pages to the big problem of permanence of web resources (how did that become the major issue involving Web 2.0 in education?). More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:55 - - Permalien [#]

E-Authoring Our Eduselves

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. E-Authoring Our Eduselves
Doug Noon raises the interesting thought that a student's portfolio is a way to evaluate his or her teachers. Not an entirely fair way (because, after all, what teacher can control his or her charges?) but useful enough to give a rough indication. "Not that I'd mind," he writes, "but here I am just making it up as I go! There's no standards for e-portfolios yet, are there?" More thoughts on student web postings from the Illuminated Dragon. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:55 - - Permalien [#]

How the Open Source Movement Has Changed Education: 10 Success Stories

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. How the Open Source Movement Has Changed Education: 10 Success Stories
I think the author's definition of 'open source' is a bit loose - how else could 'Google' get onto the list? - and I think that the definition of 'success' is even looser - how else could OpenOffice get onto the list - but the author has nonetheless made the point that open source (or open something) has changed learning, and for the better. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:54 - - Permalien [#]


The Frontier of Education: Web 3D

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Frontier of Education: Web 3D
This is the best post of 2007 to date. My feeling is that the Web 3D described by Vicki Davis here is a lot more likely to have legs than the weakly insipid Web 3.0 touted by the backers of the corporate semantic web. "The 3D web has really been around since the Sims went online and allowed people to virtually live next to each other. However, things like Second Life, Xbox live, Google Earth and World of Warcraft, are just beginning to show the power of networks and engagement of the 3D web. Now things like Moove and Kaneva are cropping up. The MetaVerse roadmap first met last year to discuss the 'pathway to the 3D web.'"
And more, "I think the next big browser will allow you to interact in 3D with any website. (Yes, Second Life is open source, but the environment is not!) Why should you have to 'join?' Shouldn't there be protocols and filters and standards for a 3D web browsing experience just like we have with a 2D experience of words and static photographs?" Quite right. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:27 - - Permalien [#]

Youtube Banned In Victoria (AU) To Halt Cyberbullying

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Youtube Banned In Victoria (AU) To Halt Cyberbullying
The edublogosphere has erupted at the news that YouTube has been banned in schools in the Australian state of Victoria (oddly, since YouTube bans are actually fairly common). But the cartoon in this post says it best: "Put bullying back on the playground where it belongs." And also, "One of my students recently pointed out that cyberbullying is simply an imitated form of mass media. Take Britney's recent breakdown and all of the media coverage that it has provoked. You can already purchase 'Rehab Britney' on eBay. If we are going to ban Youtube, why not ban mass media while we are at it." The adults of this world are very frequently vindictive, mean-spirited and bullying. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:26 - - Permalien [#]

Students Should Use Google Calendar

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Students Should Use Google Calendar
I don't really use calendars. Mostly, I just remember things, though I will on occasion resort to a list if it gets busy (while a student I relied on a crumpled sheet of paper with assignment due-dates on it, and these days my email folders for conferences carry the conference date as the folder name). So my experiment with the Google calendar, a tenuous foray at best, ended when Google messed up the login IDs by combining Blogger and Google and offering no way to migrate data from one account to another. But the experience was otherwise positive and there was a lot to like about Google Calendar. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:26 - - Permalien [#]

What Is a Dublin Core Application Profile, Really?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. What Is a Dublin Core Application Profile, Really?
This is a pretty good post, though the writing is pretty dense - if you are not deeply into metadata and application profiles then you might not be interested in this post. Basically, Dublin Core (as with any metadata specification) leaves open the question of which sort of descriptions ought to apply to which sort of entities in different contexts. An application profiles provides this determination. In this post, the development of application profiles as 'templates' or 'patterns' is discussed, what might be called 'description profiles'.
That said, work is progressing on a Education application profile via a wiki on the Dublin Core site. And Sarah Currier, in a post to the JISC mailing list, reports on the recent DC-Ed working session in Mexico. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:25 - - Permalien [#]

Canada.Com Now ...American?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Canada.Com Now ...American?
There is something very wrong with the fact that Canada.com - the online home for CanWest media properties - is now American. Readers should note that the site, which reports on and invites comments on Canadian news, "no longer falls under the jurisdiction of Canada's Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act ("PIPEDA") nor be subject to canada.com's Privacy Statement." I seldom link to Canada.com from this site because of the registration requirement. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:25 - - Permalien [#]