26 septembre 2019

No More New Speak, Back to Old Speak

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. No More New Speak, Back to Old Speak
Leigh Blackall offers some old terms that may be viewed less suspiciously than the new terms. Like saying "social constructivism" instead of "Web2.0 and Socially networked software." Nice. Except that, to me at least, the two things are very different. And except that, if somebody is only willing to listen for four seconds, then I'm not going to have much to say to them. But then again, since I don't view reality as socially defined, I don't feel as much pressure to 'sell' or 'convince' people of something. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:24 - - Permalien [#]


Internet Culture and the Evolution of Learning

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Internet Culture and the Evolution of Learning
I signed the Cluetrain Manifesto when it first came out, because I thought it captured something worthwhile. But I have always resisted the definition of 'internet culture' as defined by the whole Whole Earth - Wired crowd. In my article The Digital Nation?, written in 1997, I called it what it is: a marketing ploy. "Should Heaven and Earth move, and we all reject the free-market system as fast as a flooded North Dakota farmer, we would still be digital citizens. Wouldn't we?" More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:23 - - Permalien [#]

The Big Picture

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Big Picture
Review of Dreaming in Code, by Scott Rosenberg. Nice overview of some of the problems associated with fashioning a 'grand vision' in actual computer code. It's one thing to say "no silos" but quite another to make it work on the computer. Language warning. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:22 - - Permalien [#]

Big Labels Offer Free Music to College Students

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Big Labels Offer Free Music to College Students
The business model has changed, a bit. Ruckus Network thought that students would be happy to pay $10 or $15 to download music they have always heard on the radio for free, and they thought they could get universities to broker this for them. Students rejected the plan (the article says, incorrectly, that "college students would rather steal songs than pay," a phrasing that is bias bordering on slander) and only 20 universities agreed to do the dirty work. So now Ruckus is proposing an ad-supported free service, but still with many restrictions. Why the restrictions? Because the model isn't "free music, just like the radio," it's "free music, until they're hooked, then we charge them subscription fees." Don't be fooled. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:22 - - Permalien [#]

Building a Simple AOL Video Search API Application Using Ajax

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Building a Simple AOL Video Search API Application Using Ajax
This is a nice article. It's pretty techie, so if you're not comfortable writing Javascript code, or at least reading about it, pass this one by. But if you make web sites, you'll appreciate the clear example of a pretty avant-garde application, and especially the diagrams that show exactly how Asynchronous Javascript and XML (AJAX) mediate between web pages and application program interfaces, such as AOL's video search, to create Web 2.0 services. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:21 - - Permalien [#]


Ehabitus

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Ehabitus
Where Norm Friesen is moving his blog. Found because his most recent post, Discursive Psychology and Educational Technology: Beyond the Cognitive Revolution, caught my interest, capturing as it does some considerations that lead to what might be called post-cognitivism. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:21 - - Permalien [#]

Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow: Technology Predictions for 2007

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow: Technology Predictions for 2007
Yes it's another 'future trends' article, but I like what seems to be (when compared to all the gee-whiz homages to 2L and mobile web we've been seeing) an almost contrarian set of "opportunity areas" - and a list that is surprisingly in accord with my own thinking. Identity, developer tools, and 'mobility no longer interesting'. Yeah. Because I too am "nonplussed" by the Educause 2007 Horizon Report. As Howell writes, "according to Educause, the 'significant impact' picks for 2007 are: User-Created Content; Social Networking; Mobile Phones; Virtual Worlds; The New Scholarship and Emerging Forms of Publication; Massively Multiplayer Educational Gaming." It's not simply, as she says, that "we are doomed always to lag far behind the crest of the technological wave." More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:20 - - Permalien [#]

eLearning Papers

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. eLearning Papers
Today was a good day. The new gas furnace that we installed in the house yesterday is working perfectly (my small revenge against NB Power). Meanwhile, my web site, which started out this morning as a sparkling new Linux box, has been restored. Mostly. Still a bunch of odds and ends to fix. But this, finally, is the server I needed. Oh yeah, and my email is working again as well. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:20 - - Permalien [#]

If the Academic Library Ceased to Exist, Would We Have to Invent It?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. If the Academic Library Ceased to Exist, Would We Have to Invent It?
This article makes the case for the academic library by predicting what might happen were its services discontinued. Sadly, the predictions aren't very imaginative; people continue to need monographs and textbooks, and try to find them offline (since they aren't available online). My own prediction beings a lot like the authors: save $2.7 million by ceasing journal subscriptions and textbook purchases. Instead, the library takes the money and spends it archiving placing academic staff publications into an institutional archive, freely accessible to the public as a whole. The university's original mission. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:48 - - Permalien [#]

The Results Are In

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Results Are In
Results from a survey of edubloggers (I think I participated, anonymously) that fetched around 160 responses, which makes it a pretty good sample (I estimate the size of the edublogosphere to be about 500 bloggers). The most useful summary on the page is the slide show. It is worth noting - especially on a day where Inside Higher Ed published an article slamming ethics review boards in the humanities - that the author has made available a spreadsheet with full survey results, including the name and URL of the contributor. It seems to me that this data should be anonymized, no matter what. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:48 - - Permalien [#]