14 juin 2019

A Response to Stephen Downes, and Some Examples of Real Greed

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Terry Freedman[Edit][Delete]: A Response to Stephen Downes, and Some Examples of Real Greed, February 8, 2006
Terry Freedman responds to my lengthy (though cut-off) comment on his article and adds this item, documenting greed on the part of publishers. Well, I know that the commercial press is, shall we say, less than avove-board in its dealings with authors. From my perspective, the people who complain the most about 'pirates' are themselves the worst offenders - I saw the other day (maybe I mentioned it here?) an item pointing to the reality that copyright laws are intended to protect the corporations from each other; we (the rest of us) are simply caught in the crossfire. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:16 - - Permalien [#]


Sakai vs. Moodle

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Zack Rosen[Edit][Delete]: Sakai vs. Moodle, Zacker.org [Edit][Delete] February 8, 2006
If you want to feel some ire rise in your craw, scroll through this list of comparisons - users, vendors, traffic, business readiness, and the like, and then look at the comparisons in funding. "Moodle: $0 initial funding and ~ $12,000 a year from individual donors. Sakai Project: $2,200,000 initial grant from Mellon Foundation and Hewlett Foundation and $4,400,000 from core partners. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:15 - - Permalien [#]

WebCT Attempts to Outdo BlackBoard on Blogging System!

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. James Farmer[Edit][Delete]: WebCT Attempts to Outdo BlackBoard on Blogging System!, Incorporated Subversion [Edit][Delete]Incorporated subversion [Edit][Delete] February 8, 2006
WebCT's version of blogs: "They are locked behind WebCT's password protection; They cannot be made publicly visible; Comments can only be made by internal WebCT users using the same installation of WebCT. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:15 - - Permalien [#]

Cultivating a Classroom Learning Engine through Information Economics

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Dave Warlick[Edit][Delete]: Cultivating a Classroom Learning Engine through Information Economics, 2 cents Worth [Edit][Delete]2 Cents Worth [Edit][Delete] February 7, 2006
Interesting observation on the best strategy for schools in an era when control over content has slipped from their hands. "The content belongs to us. It's controlled by us. ..and we are producing an increasing amount of it. So I suspect that Khosla is right, we will not be able to control the content -- even in our classroom (especially in our classrooms?)". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:14 - - Permalien [#]

The Online Filling Station Model of e-learning Revisited

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Derek Morrison[Edit][Delete]: The Online Filling Station Model of e-learning Revisited, Auricle [Edit][Delete] February 7, 2006
A look at the forthcoming Sony Reader, "the latest in a line of contenders to become the e-book device of choice." Basically, it's an e-book reader that draws a lot from the recent MP3 players, such as the iPod, that have taken the market by storm. The plus? You can upload your own content (and there's a Sony version of the iTunes music store, natch, just for books). The minus? You have to convert your stuff into their proprietary format. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:13 - - Permalien [#]


Ninmah Meets World

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Rachel Smith[Edit][Delete]: Ninmah Meets World, February 6, 2006
Rachel Smith, described by Brian Lamb as "a catalyst and synthesist (among other things) with the New Media Consortium, does a lot of cool stuff with some amazing people," has launched a blog. It's still in startup mode (three posts) but do drop by and welcome her to the blogosphere. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:11 - - Permalien [#]

Students Hit The e-Books

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Yael Litmanovitz[Edit][Delete]: Students Hit The e-Books, The Guardian [Edit][Delete] February 6, 2006
Another one of those articles touting the (coming) benefit of electronic textbooks. Mostly, what we see is that publishers still don't get it - you may have a library of texts, even with 'sticky notes', but as the author notes, you remain locked into a proprietary environment, and sharing is, of course, forbidden under penalty of law. It's hard to overstate the impact of this new regime of electronic distribution; as a BBC article notes today, librarians are concerned that the new DRM will make it impossible to loan acquisitions in its collection. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:11 - - Permalien [#]

The End of the Internet?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Jeff Chester[Edit][Delete]: The End of the Internet?, The Nation [Edit][Delete] February 6, 2006
A blunt assessment (which I can confirm through various other sources) of how commercial providers see online content. "The nation's largest telephone and cable companies are crafting an alarming set of strategies that would transform the free, open and nondiscriminatory Internet of today to a privately run and branded service that would charge a fee for virtually everything we do online". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:10 - - Permalien [#]

Résultats des brevets de techniciens supérieurs Session 2018 - Note Flash n°11 - Juin 2019

Screenshot-2018-4-21 Journal de mise en ligne - ESR enseignementsup-recherche gouv frÀ la session 2018, les effectifs des candidats (181 300) au brevet de technicien supérieur progresse légèrement (+700). Leur taux de succès, de 74,5 %, fléchit de 0,7 point par rapport à 2017. In fine, 135 100 étudiants ont obtenu leur B.T.S. en 2018, soit 700 de moins qu'en 2017. Le taux de succès des femmes, qui représentent près de la moitié des candidats mais plus de six sur dix dans le domaine des services, est supérieur de 4,5 points à celui des hommes (76,8 % contre 72,3 %). Plus...

Posté par pcassuto à 02:00 - - Permalien [#]

Parcours et réussite en STS : les indicateurs de la session 2018 - Note Flash n°10 - Juin 2019

Screenshot-2018-4-21 Journal de mise en ligne - ESR enseignementsup-recherche gouv frPrès de huit bacheliers 2015 sur dix inscrits en 1ère année de section de technicien supérieur (S.T.S.) sous statut scolaire (soit 78 % des inscrits) passent en 2nde année et 65 % d'entre eux obtiennent le B.T.S. en deux ou trois ans. Les taux de réussite varient de 50 % à 83 % selon la série du baccalauréat et de 52 % à 90 % selon la mention obtenue. La réussite est plus élevée pour les femmes : 71 % des femmes inscrites en 1ère année de B.T.S. en 2015 ont obtenu leur diplôme en deux ou trois ans contre 64 % des hommes. Plus...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:48 - - Permalien [#]