16 juin 2019

Adversity Scores

Who deserves to go to university?  Particularly the prestigious ones with selective admissions?
It’s easy enough to say “everyone”, or “anyone with the ability to benefit from it”, but when it comes to any specific institution, usually the demand for spaces exceeds the supply.  When that happens, some type of rationing procedure comes into play.  In nearly every country in the world (Canada is a rare exception), this rationing gets done either partly or completely on the basis of a set of standardized exams. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:56 - - Permalien [#]


Policy Stasis in Australia

On the higher education front, the line between the two parties was clear.  The coalition under Abbott tried to cut grants to universities while allowing them to recoup funds through a program of radical de-regulation.  Those plans foundered in the Senate, where the government did not have a majority and could not convince the smaller parties to support the plan. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:53 - - Permalien [#]

The Coming Crisis in Canadian Post-secondary Education: 3 – Some strategies for survival

http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/asssociates.jpgBy . I have argued in earlier posts that universities and colleges (everywhere, not just Canada) need to move more quickly into digital learning for two separate but linked reasons:
  • to develop the knowledge and skills needed in a digital age
  • to enable students to know how better to manage and control the digitalization of their lives.
Although Canadian institutions are moving in the direction of more digital learning, it is still a relatively marginalised movement. We need to move to the point where almost all courses include a mix of digital and face-to-face learning, or are fully online, within the next five years. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:41 - - Permalien [#]

The Coming Crisis in Canadian Post-secondary Education: 2 – The Canadian context

http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/asssociates.jpgBy . This is the second in a series of posts on this topic. The first post looked at external developments that will influence Canadian post-secondary education in the future. In this post, I focus particularly on the Canadian context. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:40 - - Permalien [#]

The Coming Crisis in Canadian Post-secondary Education: 1 – External Developments

http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/asssociates.jpgBy . MOOCs are an interesting and useful development, but they have settled into a niche for continuing education and corporate training rather than disrupting the current system. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:38 - - Permalien [#]


Regional report on online learning in the provinces of Atlantic Canada

http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/asssociates.jpgBy . Even though institutions are currently in the process of collecting and returning data for the 2019 survey of online learning in Canadian post-secondary institutions, we (the Canadian Digital Learning Research Association) are still working through some of the 2018 data. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:37 - - Permalien [#]

What are the key online learning markets over the next few years?

http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/asssociates.jpgBy . The short (13 pages) paper by Lomas and Ashburn is required reading for AVP’s Teaching and Learning and for Directors of Online Learning programs. Although clearly focused on the USA, it is also directly relevant here in Canada. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:36 - - Permalien [#]

Should universities contact parents / guardians when students face mental health challenges?

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "hepi"The HEPI / Advance HE 2019 Student Academic Survey Survey shows nearly all students think it is sometimes right for universities to contact parents or guardians about mental ill-health, especially in ‘extreme circumstances’. Only 18% reject the idea. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:08 - - Permalien [#]

Augar and the Four Horses

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "hepi"At the start of the Augar Review, the panel set out their eight guiding principles. Number four is:

“The cost of post-18 education should be shared between taxpayers, employers and learners.”

I agree, but, it seems, the panel itself didn’t. Reading the Review – which is in many ways a fine and thoughtful document – among its fifty mostly welcome recommendations, I cannot find a single one about how employers should share the cost. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:07 - - Permalien [#]

All Hail to the Augar

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "hepi"It took its time but finally the Augar Review has landed. And for the Further Education (FE) sector there is much to celebrate. The review is clear. Enough is enough. No more Cinderella sector. If the UK wants to resolve the skills element of its productivity conundrum then the FE sector needs to be rapidly recapitalised, its workforce upskilled, its status upgraded and the regulatory system rebooted in order to deal with, what Augar describes, as the ‘missing middle’ of level 4 and 5 technical qualifications. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:05 - - Permalien [#]