05 mars 2019

The MORU as Precursor to the MOOC

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The MORU as Precursor to the MOOC
Darin Hayton, March 17, 2013
So, "MOOCs are all the rage right now," writes Darin Hayton. "Academics [are] generally upset or unimpressed and disruptors generally optimistic. What intrigues me is how familiar the kook-aid tastes." I have always tried to be clear that the phenomenon of mass education was well established before MOOCs, and therefore that what makes MOOCs different, at least the way we do them, isn't the massiveness, but the network structure, which permits both scaling and interactivity. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:51 - - Permalien [#]


Learners Are People, Not Isolated Test-Taking Brains: Why MOOCs Both Work and Fail

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Learners Are People, Not Isolated Test-Taking Brains: Why MOOCs Both Work and Fail
Susan D. Blum, Huffington Post, March 17, 2013
Those readers who know my history know that I began online with MUDs a type on MMOG (Massively Multiplayer Online Game). I saw in them what Nick Yee saw: "achievement, social, and immersion factors." Fast-forward some twenty years and here I am working on MOOCs, which for me are based on many of the same principles as MUDs. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:50 - - Permalien [#]

The Professors Who Make the MOOCs

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Professors Who Make the MOOCs
Steve Kolowich, The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 18, 2013
Survey of 103 people (probably most of them professors) who have designed and offered a MOOC. Interestingly, most of them who participated did so for altruistic reasons (which makes a mash of Coursera's business model) while a few - such as those who had written textbooks - did it to "protect their roost." Many of them see a positive outcome for MOOCs. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:49 - - Permalien [#]

It’s Not Just Reader: Google Kills Chrome RSS Add-On Too

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. It’s Not Just Reader: Google Kills Chrome RSS Add-On Too
Scott Gilbertson, WebMonkey, March 18, 2013
Those of you who were using Chrome because it was new and cool - well, you may want to rethink. "The company has also killed off its RSS extension for Chrome, and marked a longstanding bug requestingthat the extension become a native part of Chrome as 'Won’t Fix.' Add it all up and it certainly looks like Google wants to not just shut down an unprofitable service, but to kill off its support for RSS entirely." Why would this be, you might ask. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:49 - - Permalien [#]

RIP Google Reader: Don’t Scream Who Moved My Cheese, Pivot Your Reading

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. RIP Google Reader: Don’t Scream Who Moved My Cheese, Pivot Your Reading
Beth Kanter, Beth's Blog, March 18, 2013
A lot of people have been expressing this sentiment over the last few days - Google Reader is over, it was a nice free service while it lasted, but it's done, so let's move on. Which is fair enough and quite right: non of us had any right to expect Google Reader to continue forever. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:48 - - Permalien [#]


French scholars say ‘oui’ to open access

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. French scholars say ‘oui’ to open access
Paul Jump, Times Higher Education, March 28, 2013
The Times Higher Education reports "Sixty senior figures from the humanities and social sciences in France have published a statement in national newspaper Le Monde in support of open access." It adds that the statement Who Is Afraid of Open Access? has received more than 2,000 endorsements from individuals and (mostly) organizations. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:47 - - Permalien [#]

POERUP elevator pitch: 26 countries in 26 minutes

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. POERUP elevator pitch: 26 countries in 26 minutes
Paul Bacsich, Slideshare, March 28, 2013
Interesting presentation surveying 26 open educational resource (OER) initiatives in 26 countries, including Europe, North America, Australasia and the Middle East Gulf region (conspicuously missing are reports from South America, India and China). More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:46 - - Permalien [#]

MOOC Manifesto

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. MOOC Manifesto
Conecta13, March 28, 2013
This 'MOOC manifesto' came to me via Twitter and while I am sympathetic with the intent, the manifesto is almost point for point opposed to my own view of MOOCs. "In every teaching design," it begins falsely, "the learner is the centre." And then, "MOOCs must be an element within the digital strategy of an institution," and "Institutions may consider MOOCs basically as a branding instrument," and "Institutions may need to consider the prerequisites to enter a MOOC" seem to place MOOCs well within the institutional context, which is probably (in the longer run) not where they belong. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:45 - - Permalien [#]

Trend Report: Open Educational Resources 2013

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Trend Report: Open Educational Resources 2013
Ria Jacobi, Hester Jelgerhuis, Nicolai van der Woert, SURF, March 28, 2013
This is a substantial document that "describes trends in open educational resources (OER) and open education in the Netherlands and elsewhere, from the perspective of Dutch higher education." Topics covered include not only OERs but also MOOCs, badges and learning analytics. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:44 - - Permalien [#]

Buying Our Way into Bondage: The Risks of Adaptive Learning Services

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Buying Our Way into Bondage: The Risks of Adaptive Learning Services
David Wiley, iterating toward openness, March 28, 2013
I've never been big on adaptive learning systems because they resemble too much to me the old programmed learning texts that were essentially a series of branches and pages. David Wiley in this post offers another reason to be wary. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:44 - - Permalien [#]