21 février 2019

The OA Interviews: Arul George Scaria

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The OA Interviews: Arul George Scaria
Richard Poynder, Open and Shut?, 2018/11/19
This is an interview with Arul George Scaria, the principle investigator of a landscape survey (175 page PDF) of the current situation in India as concerns open science conducted by the Centre for Innovation, Intellectual Property and Competition (CIIPC) in New Delhi. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:36 - - Permalien [#]


The Case Against Quantum Computing

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Case Against Quantum Computing
Mikhail Dyakonov, IEEE Spectrum, 2018/11/19
We've seen a number of breathless predictions for quantum computing in the last couple of years. This article throws a cautionary note into our coverage. Here's the problem: "A useful quantum computer needs to process a set of continuous parameters that is larger than the number of subatomic particles in the observable universe." This in itself in't a big deal; the computer on which I'm typing this has 64 Gig RAM, which has ((64*8)^2)-1) possible states. The problem is that unlike my computer, in a quantum computer, each bit is in a probabilistic state, not an on-off state. But so what? Why wouldn't 'gating' work? As one commenter says, you can emulate my computer "on a quantum computer with circuit depth 1 by applying e.g. Hadamard gates to each individual qubit." Of course, like everything else, the proof will come in the form of actual working quantputers.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:35 - - Permalien [#]

The relationship between Personality Traits, Learning Styles and Academic Performance of E-Learners

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The relationship between Personality Traits, Learning Styles and Academic Performance of E-Learners
Nabia Luqman Siddiquei, Ruhi Khalid, Open Praxis, 2018/11/19
I like posting titles from academic journals referring to learning styles if only to needle the very loud voices from a certain quarter that there's no such thing as learning styles (and it's funny looking at the proliferation of academic studies on one side and polimics (insisting we look at the evidence) on the other side. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:34 - - Permalien [#]

Are MOOCs Going to Disappear? 4 Challenges to Overcome

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Are MOOCs Going to Disappear? 4 Challenges to Overcome
Laurie Pickard, Class Central, 2018/11/19
The answer to the question is "no", at least in my view, but for reasons having little to do with the four outstanding issues highlighted in this article. We've seen these issues show up in any number of articles: completion rates, accreditation, accessibility, and sustainability. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:33 - - Permalien [#]

Post-REST

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Post-REST
Tim Bray, Ongoing, 2018/11/19
REST stands for 'Representational State Transfer' and it was the nice light-weight way we created interfaces between programs running on the web (instead of using the heavy and over-engineered Web Services architecture). But now Tim Bray is looking at what comes after REST. "Mes­sag­ing and Event­ing... is all over, and I mean all over, the cloud in­fras­truc­ture that I work on," he writes. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:33 - - Permalien [#]


One in four Ontario postsecondary students lacks basic literacy, numeracy skills, studies say

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. One in four Ontario postsecondary students lacks basic literacy, numeracy skills, studies say
Joe Friesen, Globe and Mail, 2018/11/29
Given that Ontario students rank among the very top in international testing, I greet this attention-grabbing headline with a great deal of scepticism. To me it has all the makings of a manufactured crisis. The article makes it clear that the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario is working with a revised definition of literacy. "The test was not measuring whether students can read or do arithmetic, but whether they can take written or numerical information and use it to solve problems." Here's the report: 74 page PDF. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:32 - - Permalien [#]

Misleading on Fair Dealing, Part 7: My Appearance Before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Misleading on Fair Dealing, Part 7: My Appearance Before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage
Michael Geist, 2018/11/29
Michael Geist continues his series on how the government is being misled about fair dealing (previously covered here; see also Part 6, Part 8). This post summarizes his findings in a statement before the committee. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:31 - - Permalien [#]

The humanities keep declining: the case of history

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The humanities keep declining: the case of history
Bryan Alexander, 2018/11/29
Bryan Alexander summarizes a report from the American Historical Association showing that the number of history majors in U.S. universities has dropped significantly over the last decade. The xplanations offered don't seem very plausible - the lack of jobs for history majors is one factor, but this has always been true. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:31 - - Permalien [#]

Developers, start your engines

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Developers, start your engines
Amazon.Com, 2018/11/29
This is one of the more interesting of Amazon's announcements thisd week. 'Deep Racer' is a scale model racing car. Inside, it has a reinforcement learning engine. You train your car to race, and then submit your trained engine to Amazon to compete in actual road races with your self-driving car. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:30 - - Permalien [#]

Autograding System Goes Awry, Students Fume

Stephen Downes PhotoBy Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Autograding System Goes Awry, Students Fume
Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed, 2018/11/30
This article describes the failings of an autograding system in use in a computing science class in Berkeley. The use of autograders in computer sciences is a natural development, as programs can be tested by debuggers and efficiency algorithms to determine not only whether they run at all, but also how well they run. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:29 - - Permalien [#]