27 février 2019

The Human Brain Project

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Human Brain Project
Human Brain Project, March 5, 2013
This is what real research in IT looks like. The researchers will bring in all the results from the biological and physiological literature on neural function. They will integrate these findings into a massive simulation of the human brain. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:39 - - Permalien [#]


Auti-sim lets you experience the horror of sensory overload

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Auti-sim lets you experience the horror of sensory overload
Kyle Orland, Ars Technica, March 5, 2013
What is it like to be autistic? Most of us can't experience sensory overload directly, but with a simulation developed during Vancouver's Hacking Health weekend hackathon we can begin to approximate the sensation. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:38 - - Permalien [#]

Naming Conventions For Institutional Repositories: Lessons from CORE

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Naming Conventions For Institutional Repositories: Lessons from CORE
Brian Kelly, UK Web Focus, March 6, 2013
As Brian Kelly summarizes, "The CORE (COnnecting REpositories) project aims to 'facilitate free access to scholarly publications distributed across many systems'." From the web site, the basic services offered by CORE are:

  • CORE Portal - Allows to search and navigate scientific publications aggregated from a wide range of Open Access Repositories (OARs)
  • CORE Mobile - An Android application that enables you to search and download open access articles.
  • CORE Plugin - A Plugin to Open Access repositories that enables them to search for related scientific publications.
  • CORE API - Enables external systems and services to interact with the CORE repository.
  • Repository Analytics - A tool that enables to monitor the ingestion of metadata and content from repositories. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:37 - - Permalien [#]

Teenagers and Abstract Thinking: Unclear on the Concept?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Teenagers and Abstract Thinking: Unclear on the Concept?
Shawn Cornally, Edutopia RSS, March 6, 2013
Another of my early learning confessions: I had a terrible time with the whole concept of abstract reasoning when I was young. On reflection, I think it was because most of my learning was focused on the concrete: phonics and reading texts, mathematical operations, facts in science and history, and the like. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:37 - - Permalien [#]

inBloom & Microsoftian Over-reach

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. inBloom & Microsoftian Over-reach
Tom Hoffman, Tuttle SVC, March 6, 2013
inBloom is basically a learning support application that pulls together student data in order to make recommendations. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:36 - - Permalien [#]


The Amplify Tablet: A Device Custom Made For Teachers And Students

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Amplify Tablet: A Device Custom Made For Teachers And Students
Jeff Dunn, Edudemic, March 6, 2013
Did the world need "a device custom made for teachers and students?" I don't know, but it now has one, courtesy the the edtech startup Amplify(which naturally launched at SXSW). From my admittedly distance perspective, the designers have confused "education" with "command and control":

  • The teacher has the ability to monitor everything happening on the rest of the tablets in the classroom.
  • the ability for a teacher to send out an ‘eyes on teacher’ announcement where all devices tell the student to look up at the teacher. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:36 - - Permalien [#]

What can I do with my educational data? (#lak13)

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. What can I do with my educational data? (#lak13)
Sheila MacNeill, Sheila’s work blog, March 6, 2013
I think this topic will be on the top of a lot of minds in the next little while. No, not simple "what can I do with my educational data?" though that will certainly be the topic of conversation. But the other one: who owns my educational data? The question was prompted for Sheila MacNeill by the recent #etmooc webinar featuring Audrey Watters titled 'who owns your education data?'. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:35 - - Permalien [#]

No. 5 aha moment: the Web as a universal standard

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. No. 5 aha moment: the Web as a universal standard
Tony Bates, online learning and distance education resources, March 8, 2013
This is another in the ongoing series by Tony Bates. The particular insight reported this time is "The web allows rich multimedia material to be transmitted to any computer, any software system, anywhere in the world, with an Internet connection. This has had profound implications for the design of online teaching which we still have by no means fully understood or exploited." It took several years for people to realize this, and I don't think it became obvious until the launch of the Mosaic browser in 1993 - it was then we could actually see media (well, slowly loading images) integrated with text. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:34 - - Permalien [#]

Further Evidence of Complete Stupidity in the US Patent Office

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Further Evidence of Complete Stupidity in the US Patent Office
Stephen Marshall, Stephen's Blog, March 8, 2013
As Stephen Marshall says, "I really wish the trade people discussing the need for stronger intellectual property protection would deal with the problem of stupid patents like this - they would have more credibility in arguing their case if they weren't trying to protect a fundamentally corrupt and broken system." Why the outburst. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:33 - - Permalien [#]

Re-thinking Workplace Learning: extracting rather than adding

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Re-thinking Workplace Learning: extracting rather than adding
Charles Jennings, performance.learning.productivity, March 8, 2013
Typically when people think of workplace learning they think of the learning as something added to the work. That's the sense of the phrase "on the job training" - as though training weren't something you would notmally be doing. Charles Jennings recasts that way of thinking in what I think is a compelling manner - instead of learning being added to the work, it's something extractedfrom the work. Now this isn't 'knowledge capture' or some similar information mining technique. The idea here is one of supporting staff to learn more from their day-to-day work activities. This approach creates challenges: "It can’t be managed and controlled in the way discrete training and learning injections into the workflow can be, [and]most of the learning processes are opaque to HR and L&D." [Link] [Comment]. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:33 - - Permalien [#]