31 mai 2018

Ontario (Dumpster Fire) Manifesto Analysis

By Alex Usher. You may have heard that there is an election on in Ontario.  I tried my best to leave the province for the duration but I’m back now, and holy Moses I wish I weren’t.  It is truly godawful.  A dumpster fire, as the kids say.  But duty calls, and so, forthwith, the traditional HESA platform analysis. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:57 - - Permalien [#]


Faculty and Boards of Governors

By Alex Usher. While I was away having fun in Japan (the sumo was excellent, btw), the Canadian Association of University Teachers released a report called Board of Governors Structures at Thirty-One Canadian Universities ,which is well worth a gander.  As is often the case with CAUT’s stuff, it’s a mix of very useful and factual material combined and some…ah…curious editorializing. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:56 - - Permalien [#]

FutureSkills Lab: Told You So.

By Alex Usher. A short one today because I’m still theoretically on vacation and have to catch a train (Nagano!)
Remember that RFP I told you le tout Ottawa was talking about?  It’s out.  You can read it in all its glory here. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:55 - - Permalien [#]

Better Know a Higher Ed System: Japan (3)

By Alex Usher. Japan is one of the world’s most hierarchical societies.  You could have a pretty good argument about whether or not this is an artefact of the Tokugawa bakufu of the 17th century or if it goes back to the Kamakura regime of the 12th – 14th centuries, but either way, it’s been that way a long-time.  It’s in the language, the culture, the politics – pretty much everywhere.  And so, too, in the higher education system. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:53 - - Permalien [#]

Better Know a Higher Ed System: Japan (Part 2)

By Alex Usher. We all know that Japan is a technological leader, right? An “innovation nation”?  And we all know innovation comes from universities, right?  So Japanese universities must be kind of god-like in their innovation abilities, right?  Right. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:52 - - Permalien [#]


Better Know a Higher Ed System: Japan (Part 1)

By Alex Usher. Japan is a fascinating country for any number of reasons, but one of them is that it has played technological catch-up with the west not once but twice, and in both cases very successfully.  As such, reflecting on the role universities have played sheds considerable light on what we think of as “universal truths” about the benefits of higher education. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:51 - - Permalien [#]

Good Things

By Alex Usher. I am in a very good mood today, what with tomorrow being the start of a 2-week holiday in Tokyo which includes plenty of sumo (my daughter, the family expert, is predicting Hakuho 白鵬 to win the yūshō in a canter and Tochinoshin 栃ノ心 to win the 10 matches needed for promotion to ōzeki). More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:50 - - Permalien [#]

Financial Barriers

By Alex Usher. Following on from yesterday’s blog about Human Capital Theory, I thought it would be worth talking a little more broadly about financial barriers to higher education and what we mean by that term.  Because there are at least three different phenomena at work, and much too much policy confuses the three. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:49 - - Permalien [#]

Is there online learning in North Korea?

http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/asssociates.jpgBy . Yes, North Korea has (fairly recently) started delivering streamed lectures at a distance through some of its more prestigious universities, such as Kim Il-sung University. This prestigious university recently awarded degrees to those who finished their program via a distance learning course for the first time. You can even watch a promotional video from a North Korean web site. (It helps if you speak Korean, which I don’t, and it took over 10 minutes to download the 48 second video.) Students can watch the programs on laptops, tablets or mobile phones. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:28 - - Permalien [#]

Active learning at the Royal Military College of Canada

http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/asssociates.jpgBy . The RMC is the military college of the Canadian Armed Forces, and is a degree-granting university training military officers. RMC was established in 1876 and is the only federal institution in Canada with degree-granting powers. Programs are offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels, both on campus as well as through the college’s distance learning programme via the Division of Continuing Studies. It has a total of about 3,000 students, with about one-third part-time/distance and about 300 taking post-graduate studies. It is fully bilingual. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:27 - - Permalien [#]