26 juillet 2017

Indigenous picture books offering windows into worlds

The ConversationIn a town by the sea that lies in the homeland of the Yawuru people, there sits a small publisher. But in the scope of its ambition, the depth and complexity of its range, and its commitment to bringing the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to all Australians, Magabala Books looms large on the Australian literary landscape. More...

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Infographic: Are we making progress on Indigenous education?

The ConversationIn this series, we’ll discuss whether progress is being made on Indigenous education, looking at various areas including policy, scholarships, school leadership, literacy and much more. More...

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Could you pass the proposed English test for Australian citizenship?

The ConversationThe Australian government is proposing tough new English language competency requirements for those seeking Australian citizenship. More...

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Incentives for academics can have unintended, negative consequences

The ConversationRent seeking is a term coined in economics to describe the process by which private entities seek to use the state’s power to obtain or protect excessive economic surplus. More...

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How math education can catch up to the 21st century

The ConversationIn 1939, the fictional professor J. Abner Pediwell published a curious book called “The Saber-Tooth Curriculum.”
Through a series of satirical lectures, Pediwell (or the actual author, education professor Harold R. W. Benjamin) describes a Paleolithic curriculum that includes lessons in grabbing fish with your bare hands and scaring saber-toothed tigers with fire. More...

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Being black in a white skin: students with albinism battle prejudice

The ConversationMyths and stereotypes about albinism abound. People with the condition are called derogatory names, like inkawu – the Nguni term for white baboon – and isishawa, a Zulu word for a person who is cursed. They are stared at, and must field ignorant questions. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:10 - - Permalien [#]

University tests should be part and parcel of teaching - not stand-alone events

The ConversationStandardised tests exist in education systems all over the world. South Africa is no exception – and its test results often make for depressing reading. More...

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Challenging the status quo in mathematics: Teaching for understanding

The ConversationDespite decades of reform efforts, mathematics teaching in the U.S. has changed little in the last century. As a result, it seems, American students have been left behind, now ranking 40th in the world in math literacy. More...

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What lies behind the rise of Christian universities in Africa

The ConversationThe last two decades have seen a brisk growth in Christian universities in sub-Saharan Africa. This phenomenon exists at the intersection of two of the most dynamic social trends on the continent: the rapid rise of Christian adherence and the volatile growth of higher education. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:07 - - Permalien [#]

Why Kenya’s electorate should be wary of bold education reform promises

The ConversationKenyan voters are being fed a daily diet of grand promises in the lead up to the country’s national elections. If either of the two main coalitions win power in polls scheduled for August 8, 2017, citizens can look forward to free maternity services, free public secondary school, farm subsidies, lower food prices and much more. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:05 - - Permalien [#]