13 mai 2016

Qu’est-ce qui détermine notre intelligence ? Quand la génétique suscite la controverse

The ConversationPar . Francis Galton, cousin de Charles Darwin et père de l’eugénisme, a été l’un des premiers à étudier l’intelligence de façon formelle. Dans Hereditary Genius, publié en 1869, il défend l’idée que les facultés mentales supérieures se transmettent par sélection naturelle. Son étude se limite toutefois aux hommes les plus éminents d’Europe, « une lignée de génies », et, à quelques rares exceptions, il attribue aux femmes, aux minorités ethniques et aux classes populaires des aptitudes intellectuelles inférieures. Voir l'article...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:15 - - Permalien [#]


Digital natives (4) : désormais tous nomades à l’école

The ConversationPar . Dans le mythe du « natif du numérique » (digital native) déjà évoqué pour The Conversation France et qui émerge en 2001 à travers les écrits du chercheur américain Marc Prensky, le rôle central joué par le phénomène de panique générée par les médias mérite d’être approfondi. Voir l'article...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:14 - - Permalien [#]

Pour une éducation à une culture européenne connectée (1)

The ConversationPar . Le forum #european.lab s’est penché tout un week-end sur la thématique d’une réflexion à l’émergence d’une culture européenne, d’une éducation à une culture européenne connectée. Voir l'article...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:11 - - Permalien [#]

Slang shouldn’t be banned … it should be celebrated, innit

The ConversationBy . Geezers and girls literally ain’t allowed to use slang words like “emosh” (emotional) anymore. The head teacher and staff of an academy in Essex, England appear to have taken great pleasure in banning the type of slang used in reality television series TOWIE, including many of the words in the above sentence, in a bid to improve the job prospects of their students. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:08 - - Permalien [#]

Free university tuition will help SNP defend a very mixed record on education

The ConversationBy . How has education fared in Scotland since the SNP was re-elected in 2011? The first thing to say is that the Scottish government has successfully seen through a major curriculum reform. Launched in 2004 under the Labour-Lib Dem administration, the Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) covers all learners from aged three upwards. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:06 - - Permalien [#]


The philosophy of chemistry … and what it can tell us about life, the universe and everything

The ConversationBy . Philosophy asks some fundamental and probing questions of itself. What is it? Why do we do it? What can it achieve? As a starting point, the word “philosophy” comes from the Greek words meaning a love of wisdom. And anyone who does it is trying to make sense of the world around them. In that way, philosophers are a bit like scientists. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:04 - - Permalien [#]

What the U-turn on academies means for Conservative education policy

The ConversationBy . The secretary of state for education, Nicky Morgan, has backed down on plans to force all schools in England to become academies by 2022, outlined in a recent education white paper. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:03 - - Permalien [#]

A more transparent university admissions process? Here’s what we should be talking about

The ConversationBy . It’s been a tough year for the Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR).
First, a Fairfax Media investigation showed that large numbers of students are being admitted to university programs with scores well below the cut-off. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 22:57 - - Permalien [#]

Higher education in policy paralysis after Budget 2016 – what now?

The ConversationBy . While, this year, the government finally ruled out full fee deregulation, it is still contemplating uncapped fees for some courses in its higher education consultation paper. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 22:55 - - Permalien [#]

Will the internships program help young people get jobs?

The ConversationBy . There are many different reasons why a young person might not end up securing a job. Even having a university degree doesn’t mean you will necessarily find work straight away. In fact, research shows that it now takes a young person, on average, 4.7 years to find full-time employment after graduating. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 22:54 - - Permalien [#]