30 mars 2016

Teaching Mandarin in schools is another slap in the face for African languages

The ConversationBy , , , and . It’s said that behind every powerful language is an army and money. Consider the case of English. In South Africa, as in its other colonies, the British arrived with the Bible in one hand and the breech-loader in the other. Behind them was the English language, military might and money. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:08 - - Permalien [#]


How games can hook students with short attention spans

The ConversationBy  and . Modern human beings have a shorter attention span than goldfish: ours is, on average, below eight seconds while the little fish can focus for nine seconds. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:06 - - Permalien [#]

The history of student loans goes back to the Middle Ages

The ConversationBy . In 1473, Alexander Hardynge, who had finished his bachelor’s degree at Oxford nearly two years previous, borrowed money through an educational loan service. The loan came with a one year repayment deadline.
With some of that money, he rented a room at Exeter College and offered tutoring services to college students. He soon repaid that loan. In 1475, Hardynge took out a second loan – again, in part to rent teaching space. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:04 - - Permalien [#]

The medieval power struggles that helped forge today’s universities

The ConversationBy . As universities prepare for a new regime of regulation aimed at monitoring the quality of their teaching, they may find some comfort in the 900-year-old history of debates around autonomy, governance, who can award qualifications and even the relationships between students and their teachers. Who held power over universities and their pursuit of intellectual inquiry was hotly contested in the Middle Ages. Universities were beholden to popes and kings, but also, in some cases to students. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:03 - - Permalien [#]

Decolonising economics: more context is needed, not less content

The ConversationBy . There is a new call to arms at South African universities: it’s time to decolonise the economics curriculum. This is part of a broader project to make curricula across disciplines more applicable to the South African context. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:45 - - Permalien [#]


Education can’t be for ‘the public good’ if universities ignore rural life

The ConversationBy . Education can and should change people’s lives. Education systems ought to operate with the public good in mind. But for many South Africans, this is not the case. I would suggest that part of the reason post-colonial and post-apartheid educational policies are not succeeding is because they are biased towards outcomes that are relevant only for and to urbanised contexts. They exclude rurality. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:44 - - Permalien [#]

Physiotherapy students have much to learn from the humanities

The ConversationBy . Undergraduate physiotherapy students spend most of their time learning about the basic and clinical sciences. This has a certain pragmatic appeal, but a person is more than an assemblage of body parts. Our students learn anatomy and biomechanics – the idea of bodies as machines – and then explore what can be done to those bodies in order to “fix” them. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:41 - - Permalien [#]

How to turn professionals into people who serve the public good

The ConversationBy . Development, argues Indian economist Amartya Sen, is the expansion of people’s freedoms to lead lives that matter to them. Doing so might include being treated with dignity or ensuring that their children get a decent education. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:40 - - Permalien [#]

Why it makes sense for children to learn in the language they know best

The ConversationBy . Research has proved repeatedly that children undoubtedly achieve much better when they start schooling in a language linked to one they can already use quite well. Using a familiar language for schooling is a big part of such success, which is why the late South African educationalist Neville Alexander advocated for mother tongue based-bilingual education. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:37 - - Permalien [#]

Here’s how the method of testing can change student scores

The ConversationBy . Students who recently took the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) scored lower when they took the test on a computer than when they used paper and pencil. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:21 - - Permalien [#]