08 novembre 2015

Public universities among world’s cheapest

Fees for Malaysian students in public universities are amongst the lowest in the world, with the government subsidising at least MYR16,000 (US$3,722) per student for the duration of their studies, reports Bernama. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:26 - - Permalien [#]


President orders probe into university transformation

President Jacob Zuma is currently exploring the establishment of a formal commission of inquiry to look into transformation‚ free education and institutional autonomy at institutions of higher learning, as well as living conditions of students on campuses‚ reports RDM News Wire. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:24 - - Permalien [#]

Elite universities hold key to top corporate jobs

Getting to the top of a blue-chip company is still the prerogative of those who study at the world’s most elite universities, according to Heidrick & Struggles, the executive search company, writes Della Bradshaw for FT. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:23 - - Permalien [#]

Draft regulation threatens university independence

In what is seen by many as a severe blow to academic freedom, a newly drafted regulation suggested by Turkey's Higher Education Board will pave the way for the closure of private universities, writes Hasan Karali for Today’s Zaman. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:22 - - Permalien [#]

Refugees welcome

By John J Joughin. No-one could fail to be moved by the plight of the refugees that has been played out on our television screens and in our newspapers over the summer. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:20 - - Permalien [#]


Merger prompts fears for future of higher education

By Ruwayshid Alruwaili. The world’s largest oil exporter is aiming to transform its higher education system. With the recent appointment of Dr Azzam Al-Dakhil as the new Education Minister, dramatic changes have taken place. The biggest was the merging of the two ministries – the Higher Education and Education ministries – into one ministry called the Education Ministry. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:18 - - Permalien [#]
Tags :

The best of both worlds

By Nita Temmerman. There is much written about online education’s huge, unlimited potential for outreach in developed and more so in developing countries. I have been involved first hand in facilitating workshops in such countries demonstrating the functions and benefits of online delivery, especially in expanding access to higher education. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:16 - - Permalien [#]

Can Japanese universities really become Super Global?

By Jeremy Rappleye and Edward Vickers. This year marks the launch of the most ambitious attempt to change Japanese universities since World War II: the Super Global Universities programme. From this April, 37 of Japan’s leading universities – selected by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, or MEXT, last year – began to try to redefine Japanese higher education for a new global era. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:15 - - Permalien [#]

HE must address societal challenges or lose relevance

By Graeme Atherton. More than 2,000 leaders and innovators in education from across the world gathered at the annual WISE Summit in Qatar last week. They were asked in an online poll before the event began whether they thought a university degree was essential for economic progression in the 21st century. More than 60% answered no. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:13 - - Permalien [#]

Cultural divide must end if Japan’s universities are to become ‘Super Global’

 

By Brendan O’Malley – Managing Editor. In Commentary, Jeremy Rappleye and Edward Vickers examine different scenarios regarding Japan’s ambitious Super Global Universities programme, and warn that continued segregation of international faculty and students will not lead to successful internationalisation. Nita Temmerman says that a major challenge for online learning in developing countries to address is that the learner and teacher are separated, as are the learners from each other, in societies that place high value on social contact. Ruwayshid Alruwaili says the surprising move to merge the ministries of higher education and education is feared to represent a policy drift in higher education in Saudi Arabia. And Nico Cloete discusses the flawed ideology of ‘free higher education’ in developing countries, with particular reference to the protest calls in South Africa.
In our World Blog this week Rahul Choudaha says that the last thing any well-intentioned institution wants is to treat international students as ‘cash cows’ – they need rather to investigate and invest in international student success.
In Features, Jan Petter Myklebust examines the strategies behind the entry of four Irish universities into the 50 top-performing universities’ list in the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme this year.
There are two Special Reports in this issue. The first focuses on the WISE Summit held in Qatar last week, from which Nic Mitchell writes about the value of private sector funding of higher education. The second covers the Eighth Annual International Conference of the South African Technology Network, from which Karen MacGregor reports on how to encourage entrepreneurship in higher education. Read more...

By Nic Mitchell. Private sector funding of education is gradually winning over doubters about its social value as well as return on investment. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 17:11 - - Permalien [#]