17 août 2015

New centres of excellence for East and Southern Africa

By Munyaradzi Makoni. The World Bank-backed African Centres of Excellence initiative is expanding from Central and West Africa to East and Southern Africa. A call for universities that can develop highly skilled personnel and conduct applied research to meet the economic and developmental needs of the region was made in Uganda last month. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:27 - - Permalien [#]


The goal is not achieving mobility for the few, but internationalisation for all

By Brendan O’Malley – Managing Editor. In News, Brendan O’Malley reports on a landmark study for the European Parliament on the internationalisation of higher education, which calls for international mobility to be made an integral part of an internationalised curriculum to ensure internationalisation is for all.
In our blog, Hans de Wit, one of the authors of that study, warns that the growing trend for mobility in schools could create an awkward gap at universities if the curriculum is not internationalised.
In Features, Wachira Kigotho reports on analysis showing that many African universities are facing challenges from conflicts spawned in the Arab world and propelled by Islam.
In our Commentary section, Tom Abeles says the evolution of artificial intelligence will not replace university teachers but it will challenge their role and could eliminate a significant academic overhead. Conor King unpicks evidence that it is not what or where you study that matters most to your chances of earning more income, but whether you do study. Munawar A Anees and Maryam Iraj say a deadly plague of plagiarism is undermining the values of Pakistan’s universities. And Nico Cloete yearns for more ‘Triumphs and Laments’ in place of the toppling of Columbus and Rhodes. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:25 - - Permalien [#]

Africa university rankings must speak to development goals – Summit

By Karen MacGregor – Africa Editor. In Africa Features, we report on a rankings conversation held at the inaugural Times Higher Education Africa Universities Summit in Johannesburg, at which university leaders called for ‘bespoke’ indicators that encourage positive behaviour and speak to development goals.
Wachira Kigotho outlines an analysis showing that many African universities are facing challenges from conflicts spawned in the Arab world and propelled by Islam.
And in Africa Analysis, Nico Cloete compares the toppling of statues of colonialists Christopher Columbus and Cecil John Rhodes in Argentina and South Africa, and yearns for more complex notions of history to trump populist rhetoric.
In World Blog, Hans de Wit warns that growing international mobility in schools could create an awkward gap at universities if curricula are not internationalised. In News, Brendan O’Malley reports on a new European study that calls for international mobility to be made an integral part of an internationalised curriculum to ensure internationalisation is for all.
In a bumper Commentary section, among others Tom Abeles says the evolution of artificial intelligence will not replace university teachers but will challenge their role. Conor King uncovers evidence that it is not what or where you study that matters most to subsequent income earned, but rather whether you do study. And Munawar A Anees and Maryam Iraj worry that rampant plagiarism is undermining Pakistan’s universities. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:23 - - Permalien [#]

Friday Fragments - August 13, 2015

By Matt Reed. Tim Burke has a characteristically thoughtful piece about Phyllis Wise, UIUC, and expectations of administrators generally.  Well worth the read.
The Girl was trying to set up voicemail on her phone.  She was flummoxed by the prompt asking her to press the pound sign. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:19 - - Permalien [#]

Accelerator, Brake, Accelerator, Brake

By Matt Reed. The “policy wonk” level on this post is turned up to 11. You’ve been warned.
If you haven’t seen Amy Laitinen’s excellent piece on the Education Department’s failure to engage with its own sanctioned experiments with competency-based education, check it out. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:18 - - Permalien [#]


Email and The Void

By Matt Reed. I’ve worked at several different colleges now, and at every single one, I’ve heard the same discussion. It goes like this:
“Why don’t students use their college-provided email?”
“Maybe if we forced them to, like by making important things available only that way…”
“But that could impact enrollment and retention.”
“Can’t they set their emails to forward to whatever address they actually use?”
“Yes, but they don’t.”
“Maybe if we texted them…”
For a while, many students didn’t have internet access outside of class. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:16 - - Permalien [#]

Of Ceilings, Floors, and Hooks

By Matt Reed. Anyone remember HillaryCare? 
Back in the 90’s, Hillary Clinton was put in charge of developing a proposal for a national health care system. She and her group came up with a hideously complicated proposal that went exactly nowhere, and that delayed progress by twenty years. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:15 - - Permalien [#]

Public, Private, and In-Between

By Matt Reed. Greetings from New Jersey! Now, back to our regularly scheduled blog...
Is a college degree a public good or a private good? I’m starting to think the terms of the question are wrong. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:14 - - Permalien [#]

5 Waze For Higher Ed Ideas

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/technology_and_learning_blog_header.jpg?itok=aQthgJ91By Joshua KimWaze is fantastic. For those of you that have not switched over to navigating by Waze I say drop what you are doing, download the app, and go and find some traffic. You will be amazed at the power of community sourced traffic notifications, real time rerouting, warnings of upcoming speed traps and disabled vehicles. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:08 - - Permalien [#]

The 3 Orthodoxies of Educational Technology

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/technology_and_learning_blog_header.jpg?itok=aQthgJ91By Joshua Kim. Our edtech orthodoxies are so ingrained as to be invisible. We too often fail to challenge these orthodoxies as they usually go unstated, unspoken, and unchallenged.  
As a card carrying member of the higher ed edtech establishment I wish to interrogate my own implicit assumptions and beliefs. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:07 - - Permalien [#]