10 mai 2015

Attainment, Completion, and the Trouble in Measuring Them Both

By . Here’s a seemingly simple question: How have the educational-attainment rates of various groups of Americans changed over the years? 
It’s a question with considerable impact. For example, the answer could help determine how well the country’s colleges and universities are meeting its labor needs, and how equitable education is across various demographic groups. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:47 - - Permalien [#]


The Hidden Portion of Student-Loan Debt

By . More than six years after the 2008 financial crisis, American families have reduced household debt by about $900 billion.
But one type of debt has been difficult to clear: student loans. That debt continued to grow during and after the downturn, and is now greater than both auto-loan and credit-card debt.
As of the end of 2014, outstanding student-loan debt topped $1.3 trillion. About $1.1 trillion of the total came from federal student-loan programs; the remainder was from private lenders. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:46 - - Permalien [#]

Dumb Copy Editing Survives

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy . Once, when I was younger, I was (you’ll find this hard to imagine) somewhat abrasive, and I openly despised copy editors and all their kith and kin. I had formed the impression that they are all irritating, pusillanimous time-wasters. Primitive, mindless creatures whose instincts drive them, antlike, to make slavishly defined changes. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:44 - - Permalien [#]

A Kontest for Speling

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy . Apparently I subscribe to Quora. I don’t know when my subscription began. Mostly, the posts are the sort of trivia I indulge in only when desperate for work avoidance. But the question, “What is the most misspelt word in the English language?” got my attention. Of course, the first response worried the difference between misspelt and misspelled, but then we were off and running. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:41 - - Permalien [#]

Thugs Like Us

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy . In a press conference a couple of days after the 2014 Super Bowl, the Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman, who had made rather obnoxiously boastful comments after the game, was asked if he was bothered by being repeatedly referred to as a “thug.” More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:37 - - Permalien [#]


Our Own Devices

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy . From The Scottish Pulpit, 1838, courtesy of Google Books:
“For should He, by whom kings reign and  princes decree justice, withdraw that secret influence by which he directs the thoughts of men to the accomplishment of his own objects; … should he surrender the guidance of our concerns solely to the exercise of mere human talents, at the expense of  the glory due to God, even yet, without the imposition of famine, or pestilence, or sword — those more immediate executioners of divine judgments — how fearful may be the result if we are left  to our own devices!” More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:35 - - Permalien [#]

With Good Reason

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy . The query took me by surprise. A few weeks ago an editor who was reviewing a piece I had submitted (for a publication other than this one) wrote:

You start one paragraph: “There’s good reason we associate. … ” It caught my eye — and I figured I better check! It’s such a subtle little twist, i.e., “There’s good logic to support this idea. … ” vs. “There is a specific reason we think this way. … ” which would require one to insert the “a.” Which one were you going for?

I thought, I was going for “There’s good reason. … ”. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:34 - - Permalien [#]

How to Remove Bias From Peer Review

By . The ugly side of peer review was on full display last week when a scientific paper was rejected for reasons that smacked of sexism. Two female authors had submitted a paper to a journal that is part of the open-access PLOS family. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:31 - - Permalien [#]

Save the Academic Conference. It’s How Our Work Blossoms.

By . It’s fun to mock academic conferences. They are quite mockable, because academics are nerds. At our best, because we all know that we are nerds, we work hard but don’t take ourselves or our rituals too seriously.
And yet I was concerned when Christy Wampole, an assistant professor of French and Italian at Princeton, asked, in a widely shared essay in The New York Times, “What is the purpose of the conference?” Her purpose was to call for better behavior, promoting a manifesto of best practices (and they are good practices, over all). But I took the question seriously. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:29 - - Permalien [#]

M-I-C-K-E-Y M-O-U-S-E

By Claire Potter. My sister bloggers Historiann (who has spent part of her sabbatical creating a snazzy new design) and Madwoman with a Laptop, now a fancy executive director, could tell you this farewell has been coming for a while. I’m hangin’ up my template.
It had to come someday. After 1,115 posts (with this one, 1,116), Tenured Radical is coming to an end. Why? you may ask. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 16:27 - - Permalien [#]