22 mars 2015

Seeing in New Dimensions

HomeBy Kaitlin Mulhere. Ask Nick Sousanis to explain how he wrote his new book, and you’ll get less a rigid recipe than a fuzzy description. Did the words come first? No. Then the images came first? Not exactly, he says. They came at once, reinforcing and advancing each other, leading to research and then revisions, the pages almost taking on a life of their own. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:35 - - Permalien [#]


Keeping a Ban, Offering Support

HomeBy Jake New. After facing nearly a year of intense scrutiny, Gordon College announced Monday that its policy barring student or faculty sex out of heterosexual marriage will remain as is. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:34 - - Permalien [#]

'Cheated'

HomeBy Jake New. For 20 years, some employees at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill knowingly steered about 1,500 athletes toward no-show courses that never met and were not taught by any faculty members, and in which the only work required was a single research paper that received a high grade no matter the content. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:32 - - Permalien [#]

Faculty Pay: Up and Uneven

HomeBy Scott Jaschik. Median base salaries of full-time faculty members at four-year colleges and universities increased by 2 percent in 2014, down from 2.1 percent the year before, according to a report being released today by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:31 - - Permalien [#]

Not a Tsunami, But...

HomeBy Scott Jaschik. In 2012, John L. Hennessy, president of Stanford University, famously told The New Yorker that technology was about to dramatically change higher education. "There's a tsunami coming," he said. The quote quickly was picked up by pundits arguing that massive open online courses were about to take over higher education. Hennessy never actually made such a prediction based on MOOCs alone, but given Stanford's crucial role in the development of MOOCs, it's perhaps not surprising the quote took hold as being about MOOCs. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:31 - - Permalien [#]


Write Privilege

HomeBy Colleen Flaherty. White privilege -- the concept that whites benefit from structural racism in ways that similarly situated nonwhites don’t -- has been hotly debated among academics for decades. But recent events -- from the riots and protests in Ferguson, Mo., to the closure of a University of Oklahoma fraternity over its racist chants, to this week’s beating of a black University of Virginia student by campus police -- have reinvigorated that debate, along with calls for teachers to talk directly with their students about white privilege. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:29 - - Permalien [#]

GTD for academics: The importance of review

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/castingoutnines-45.pngBy Robert Talbert. In the first post in this series I discussed the basic premises behind GTD and the problems it attempts to solve. In the next few posts, I want to give a description of how I operate on a day-to-day basis as a professor using GTD. You’ll see parts of my system in the process. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:20 - - Permalien [#]

An invitation to the Legacy of R. L. Moore/IBL conference

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/castingoutnines-45.pngBy Robert Talbert. If you’re interested in inquiry-based learning in mathematics, I highly recommend you consider attending the 18th Annual Legacy of R.L. Moore and IBL Conference in Austin, TX from June 25–27. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:19 - - Permalien [#]

Tinder as a prototype for intercontinental serendipity

By Brian Mathews. I’ve been experiencing the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon lately. This is when you discover a new word, concept, song, book, product or whatever and then it seemingly appears everywhere. In my case this has been related to maps and global communications. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:17 - - Permalien [#]

Monday Is OK Day

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy . Monday is the anniversary of the birth of the expression OK, 176 years ago, on the second page of the Boston Morning Post for Saturday, March 23, 1839. OK began as a joke, a deliberately misspelled abbreviation of “all correct.” And it remained a joke for the better part of a century, even as it was being put to serious use in OK-ing documents, train departures and arrivals, and wholesome products like Pyle’s O.K. Soap. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:15 - - Permalien [#]