11 novembre 2014

Being Foreign on the U.S. Academic Market

HomeBy Christopher Garland. About this time last year, I celebrated my seventh year of living in the United States. To be clear, “celebrated” is probably much too generous a term for that particular moment, in part because it was also the fifth year of my Ph.D. and my first year on the job market. As much as I have come to think of the United States as my permanent residence, I was facing a reality that I preferred to ignore if at all possible. I was a Ph.D. student, in English, in 2013. While I had attempted to tick all the boxes that I could in order to be the best possible candidate, the statistics weren’t exactly encouraging. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:53 - - Permalien [#]


Dealing With the Press

HomeBy Rob Weir. If your school is anything like mine, there’s constant buzz (pressure?) about how to get out the word about all the wonderful things that happen on campus. Professors are increasingly asked make themselves “available” to the public, take part in “outreach” efforts, or become “public intellectuals.” What far too few administrations or news offices do is provide much training on how to engage media outlets effectively. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:52 - - Permalien [#]

What's the Academic's Role?

HomeBy Jason D. Seacat. Is it appropriate for academics to cross the boundary between conducting research and engaging in advocacy on the basis of their empirical findings? For the first time in my career, I have really begun grappling with this question. This summer marked the greatest amount of attention paid to any research project I have conducted. The Journal of Health Psychology published my project, titled “A Daily Diary Assessment of Female Weight Stigmatization.Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:35 - - Permalien [#]

On Assessing Student Learning, Faculty Are Not the Enemy

HomeBy Jeffrey Alan Johnson. “Why do we have such trouble telling faculty what they are going to do?” said the self-identified administrator, hastening to add that he “still thinks of himself as part of the faculty.”
“They are our employees, after all. They should be doing what we tell them to do.” Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:32 - - Permalien [#]

Reading, Writing, Rhetoric

HomeBy Erik Esckilsen. Autumn in an election year is my favorite time to teach college rhetoric. I’ve yet to find a more potent text on the subject than the modern American political campaign. But my excitement about grappling with what candidates are saying and how they’re saying it also puts me under some pressure. As a teacher whose students are entering their first semester of college (excepting a few transfers), I feel a heightened sense of obligation to help them “read” the campaigns closely and critically -- and to apply their learning at the polls, most of them for the first time. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:29 - - Permalien [#]


Innovation vs. Gatekeeping

HomeBy Doug Lederman. The tension between promoting innovation and new approaches on the one hand and protecting academic quality and federal financial aid funds on the other is at the core of many major issues in higher education -- not the least of which is the accreditation system. The system of peer-reviewed quality assurance is frequently attacked as a brake on progress and competition in American higher education, even as others criticize it for going too soft on institutions in ways that cost taxpayers money. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:23 - - Permalien [#]

'How to Be an Intellectual'

HomeBy Serena Golden. Its title notwithstanding, How to Be an Intellectual (Fordham University Press) is no instructional manual. Rather, in his new book (more tellingly subtitled "Essays on Criticism, Culture, and the University"), professor and higher education writer Jeffrey J. Williams examines what it means to be an intellectual: what the role entails, how it might best be performed and, perhaps most importantly, how it has changed along with American higher education. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:22 - - Permalien [#]

They Could Go On, But Don't

HomeBy Paul Jump for Times Higher Education. While ever-greater efforts are being made to have equal numbers of male and female speakers at academic conferences, a new study suggests women (at least those in Australia) may choose to maintain a lower profile. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:20 - - Permalien [#]

Governors and Higher Ed

HomeBy Scott Jaschik. While higher education was talked about by gubernatorial candidates in many races this year, it is hard to see a clear pattern (at least on that issue) in the election outcomes. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:19 - - Permalien [#]

Getting Women to Run

HomeBy Jake New. Students at Georgetown University elected their first all-female student executive team in 2012, bringing a brief reprieve to a reign of mostly male-dominated student body presidencies dating back to when the university became fully coeducational in 1969. There have been two male presidents since, though the current administration does boast a woman vice president. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:16 - - Permalien [#]