27 octobre 2014

Father Knows Best

By Wendy Robinson. My two-year-old daughter has been sick lately. Nothing serious, thankfully, but the kind of cold where she is sneezy, clingy, and generally miserable. Last night, as I was working on revisions to my dissertation proposal, she woke up coughing and started crying pitifully from her crib. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:53 - - Permalien [#]


Finishing Grad School, Taking Lessons from Our Kids

By Travis E. Ross. Until our son was born in November 2012—over Thanksgiving break, mercifully—going to graduate school was the most grown-up thing I had ever done. Up to that point, I thought of myself primarily as a student, albeit a graduate student, a modifier I emphasized by wearing collared shirts instead of hoodies on teaching days. Becoming a parent meant conceiving of myself in fundamentally different ways. First, I learned that the impostor syndrome that I shared with all graduate students had nothing on the impostor reality I experienced when we brought a newborn home from the hospital. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:52 - - Permalien [#]

CBE

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/large/public/confessions_of_a_community_college_dean_blog_header.jpgBy Matt Reed. When Michael Dukakis ran for President, his slogan of “competence, not ideology” didn’t exactly stir the blood.  But I saw competency stir the blood of some smart people on Monday, and it gave me hope.  NEBHE - the New England Board of Higher Education - hosted a conference in Boston on Competency-Based Education, and it was one of the best I’ve attended in years. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:49 - - Permalien [#]

In Defense of Low-Hanging Fruit

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/large/public/confessions_of_a_community_college_dean_blog_header.jpgBy Matt Reed. A couple days ago, Sara Goldrick-Rab posted a tweet that I haven’t been able to shake. (In the world of Twitter, a tweet that lasts a couple of days is a classic.) She asked if anyone has done work looking at the consequences of change efforts always focusing on “low-hanging fruit.”
It’s easy to see where that critique could go. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:48 - - Permalien [#]

Hope Helps

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/large/public/confessions_of_a_community_college_dean_blog_header.jpgBy Matt Reed. IHE reported that Senator Patty Murray, of Washington, has proposed a limited reintroduction of the Ability to Benefit rule in the latest draft of the Higher Education Act. This is one of the better ideas I’ve heard from the Senate. And no, I don’t mean that as damning by faint praise Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:47 - - Permalien [#]


On The Town, Bat Boy, etc.

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/provost.jpg?itok=k-3W3N__By Herman Berliner. I recently attended the latest Broadway revival of On The Town.  The music for the show was written by Leonard Bernstein, the book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green all were based on an idea and a ballet by Jerome Robbins.  The music is great - songs that are now classics such as “New York, New York,” “Carried Away,” “I Can Cook Too” and “Lucky To Be Me” make for an enjoyable listening experience. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:45 - - Permalien [#]

Math Geek Mom: Traveling to Conferences

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/mama_phd_blog_header.jpg?itok=C5xGPD1aBy Rosemarie Emanuele. In Economics, we often talk about inputs in production being either complements or substitutes. If they are complements, like hammers and nails, then they work together to increase output. Alternatively, if two inputs are substitutes, like bricks or siding, then one input may be used in place of the other. I found myself thinking of this recently when I gave students in one of my classes, all working towards a degree in mathematical education, the assignment of attending a conference on teaching mathematics that is being held in Cleveland. I struggled with this a little because I realize that I hardly attend conferences any more, something that I justify by saying that instead of attending conferences, I publish in academic journals. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:43 - - Permalien [#]

More on Affirmative Consent

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/mama_phd_blog_header.jpg?itok=C5xGPD1aBy Susan O'Doherty. I have mentioned this here before: when I was growing up (I was born in 1952), nice girls didn't talk about sex. We weren't even supposed to think about it.
Sex was for after marriage, and then only for procreation — women who enjoyed it were nymphomaniacs, pathetic, unfeminine creatures, objects of pity and contempt. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:42 - - Permalien [#]

What Do I Have to Teach?

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/JustVisitingLogo_white.jpg?itok=K5uvzo_-By John Warner. Last post I argued that human beings are central to education. This seems obvious to me and is additionally well-supported by research showing that the most important thing that can happen for a student is to work with a faculty mentor who takes an interest in their development. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:40 - - Permalien [#]

I'm Coming to a City Near You

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/JustVisitingLogo_white.jpg?itok=K5uvzo_-By John Warner. This week I will be going on a book tour in support of my newly-released collection of short stories, Tough Day for the Army, which was called, “well-written and wonderfully comedic,” among other nice things, by Publishers WeeklyRead more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:39 - - Permalien [#]