21 septembre 2014

The History Manifesto

HomeBy Scott McLemee. When young sociologists would consult with C. Wright Mills, it’s said, he would end his recommendations with what was clearly a personal motto: “Take it big!” It was the concentrated expression of an ethos: Tackle major issues. Ask wide-ranging questions. Use the tools of your profession, but be careful not to let them dig a mental rut you can’t escape. Read more...

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Merger Causes and Consequences

HomeBy Susan Resneck Pierce. The litany of problems is well-known to readers of Inside Higher Ed: declining enrollment; untenable tuition discounts; too much debt; the growing skepticism on the part of prospective students, their families and elected officials about whether the value of a college education is worth the cost; staggering amounts of deferred maintenance and decreased state support for public campuses. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:10 - - Permalien [#]

Holding On to What We've Got

HomeBy David Galef. Student retention has been in the news a lot lately, but for a long time, no one at U of All People took it too seriously, since we’ve always had the same 20 percent rate of graduation within 20 years. To supplement our data, we also rely on anecdotal evidence, such as Professor Daissa Frogg’s looking around his biology lab in 2005 and exclaiming, “Where is everybody?” As it turned out, Professor Frogg had simply got the time wrong, and most of the students were at lunch. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:08 - - Permalien [#]

Solid Employment Rates for Science Ph.D.s

HomeBy Scott Jaschik. The 2013 unemployment rate for those with research doctoral degrees in science, engineering and health fields was 2.1 percent, one-third of the rate for the general population aged 25 or older, according to an analysis released by the National Science Foundation on Friday. Read more...

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Warnings About Tuition Discounting

HomeBy Andrew Trounson for The Australian. As Australia prepares to deregulate the setting of tuition prices, experts there are warning that universities will adopt a heretofore foreign practice that is common in the United States: discounting prices. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:06 - - Permalien [#]


Tracking a Discipline's Evolution

HomeBy Kaitlin Mulhere. Two Kent State University professors frustrated by the lack of analytical data on the evolution of their discipline have compiled all of the field’s doctoral dissertations into a database to track growth and changes in the field. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:05 - - Permalien [#]

Something Old, Something New

HomeBy Carl Straumsheim. The National Endowment for the Humanities has a new home and a new chairman, but the agency’s work to fund digital humanities projects continues unabated. The NEH Digital Humanities Project Directors Meeting was hosted for the eighth time in Washington on Monday, but for the first time in the agency’s new premises in the recently renovated Constitution Center. Read more...

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Thinking Chair

HomeBy Colleen Flaherty. Some 30 years ago, Eugene Fram, then a professor of marketing at Rochester Institute of Technology, returned a complex assignment to a graduate student with a large “C” at the top. The paper – which asked students to respond to a provocative statement about marketing with background information and citations – had been turned in late and was poorly written. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:03 - - Permalien [#]

The New Cambridge

HomeBy Chris Havergal for Times Higher Education. The £1 billion ($1.63 billion) North West Cambridge development will eventually boast 3,000 homes, half of them set aside for university staff, plus 100,000 square meters of research space and 2,000 additional bedrooms for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:02 - - Permalien [#]

Predicting Where Students Go

HomeBy Ry Rivard. A trio of senior college enrollment officials gave a peek into how they decide which students to recruit. The process now involves number-crunching students’ demographic and economic information — not just sending chipper ambassadors to every nearby high school, mailing glossy books to students’ homes and relying on gut instincts. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:01 - - Permalien [#]