31 août 2014

Has this new online college program solved the MOOC problem?

The Hechinger ReportBy . Paying to get in, degree as reward, may raise success rates, advocates say.
Dary Merckens was in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, several weeks before moving to Las Vegas. He was also entering his second month in a master’s degree program at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Merckens, who is 30, can take his education with him. That’s because he’s enrolled in Georgia Tech’s new online master’s degree in computer science. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:53 - - Permalien [#]


Higher ed employees sharing more of the cost for healthcare

http://www.universitybusiness.com/sites/default/files/UB-blue-header_3_0.pngBy Stefanie Botelho. As a result of changes to healthcare benefits stemming from the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and in an effort to better control costs, many higher education institutions are passing more of the cost of healthcare along to their employees. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:48 - - Permalien [#]

MOOCs are dead–long live the MOOC

http://www.universitybusiness.com/sites/default/files/UB-blue-header_3_0.pngBy Stefanie Botelho. Do you remember all the way back in 2013? You know, the year North West was born, the Harlem Shake made its debut, and selfies changed phone texting rates. More notably, there was the bombing at the Boston Marathon, our climate proved that abnormal would be the new normal, and our planet lost Nelson Mandela. But for those of you who attend education conferences, you also likely remember 2013 as the year that showed 5-10 MOOC sessions on every program or agenda. Some will say 2012 was the Year of the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), but 2013 was where all of the publicity started to catch up to the hype. And as someone who goes to 30 conferences a year, for me it was the year of MOOC overload. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:47 - - Permalien [#]

The quest for change in higher education

http://www.universitybusiness.com/sites/default/files/UB-blue-header_3_0.pngBy Stefanie Botelho. First American’s 5th Annual Peer Discussion event at the Seattle Space Needle during NACUBO (National Association of College and University Business Officers) was facilitated by David Helfand, former Columbia University professor and current president of Quest University – the first private university in Canada, which opened in 2007 with an innovative approach to higher education. Helfand shared his insights on the current education system in America and his mission to redefine it in Canada. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:46 - - Permalien [#]

Boycott Boycotts

By Liz Reisberg and Philip G. Altbach. Let us start out with the premise that most readers should agree with—universities are not established to be ideological organizations. Subsequently, universities should take corporate political positions only with extreme care. A related principle is that universities, as part of their commitment to academic freedom, should welcome all opinions on campus and permit unfettered free speech.  This includes speakers who have been invited to campus by academic or student organizations even if their views have been rejected by segments of the university community. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:59 - - Permalien [#]


Accreditation

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/provost.jpg?itok=k-3W3N__By Herman Berliner. I just recently completed being the first reviewer of the periodic update prepared for an institution’s regional accreditor.  I was also the second reviewer for another institution in this geographic area.  And, in addition, I was very involved in preparing our own periodic review which was due at the same time. Overall, I have been involved with the regional accreditation and the regional accrediting agency for decades. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:57 - - Permalien [#]

Internet Culture Policy and Law

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/law.jpg?itok=7sode5LvBy Tracy Mitrano. It is that time of year again for the Internet Culture Policy and Law Program! At its inception in 1995 called the “Computer Policy and Law,” and then as of 2001 the “Institute for Computer Policy and Law,” we recently renamed it “Internet Culture Policy and Law” (retaining the ICPL acronym) to reflect content shifts over time.   Once the only program of its kind, it remains higher education’s go-to conference for issues revolving around, well, the Internet, its culture, law and policy writ large (international, national, institutional and operational).  It has always been in gorgeous Ithaca, New York, and is sponsored by Cornell University’s Continuing Education Department. This year the dates are September 17-19. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:55 - - Permalien [#]

Starting the Academic Year

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/large/public/CRW.jpgBy Lee Skallerup Bessette. It's all over my social media feeds, and all over campus: school is starting up again. Adjuncts are finding their courses suddenly canceled or taken away (or, possibly worse, their salaries cut for various "reasons"). Everyone is making their syllabus, ordering books, discovering the limitations of the space they've been afforded to teach in. New jobs are starting, old jobs keep going on. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:54 - - Permalien [#]

Scanning the Library Horizon

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/library_babel_fish_blog_header.jpg?itok=qNL3hM7KBy Barbara Fister. It’s funny how much the popular image of libraries is highly traditional, considering how fascinated by the future librarians typically are and how quickly librarians embrace new technologies. References to shushing never seem to go away, and in an era when most of the library’s budget goes to licensed content, the firm belief that libraries are still mostly about books is hard to shake. We could fold into this the gendered nature of the image of librarians, who are imagined to be prim women of a certain age who wear buns and sensible shoes while doing hyper-clerical work whereas IT folks are inventive, adventurous young men with a deep knowledge of secret arts.  Yet despite the image (and I can’t wait to read a new book about it) librarians’ work is deeply tied to technology. Likewise, librarians seem to continually try to predict the future in terms of technological change, as they do in a special Horizon Report about library futures. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:51 - - Permalien [#]

On Study Abroad, Conscripted Dances, and Mysterious Natives

By Oronte. Three-thirty pm in Limpopo province in northern South Africa, just a few miles south of the Zimbabwean border. It’s early winter here, the middle of May, but like García Marquez’s mythical Macondo, these scorched mopani-and-baobab lowlands—and the people who live in them—know nothing of natural ice. Outside, the red dust of Matiyani village scalds human feet; makes children run, laughing, for the shade of thatch overhangs. On the granite hillocks, goats and cattle pant for water. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:50 - - Permalien [#]