10 août 2014

Save the Humanities / Keep Business Schools

HomeBy Sylvia Maxfield. Attacks on business and business education (including this one recently at Inside Higher Ed) are commonplace, and not just in higher education. The Obama administration’s call to action on income inequality more or less explicitly lays blame at the feet of corporate America, and Pope Francis wrote a letter last December widely interpreted as denigrating business. There is no doubt that the U.S. middle class is suffering downward mobility. Victims include the humanities professors who call for us to close business schools in order to save humanities education. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:29 - - Permalien [#]


The Hidden Curriculum

HomeBy Charlie Tyson. In recent years, many colleges and universities have turned to mentoring programs in an attempt to retain underperforming students. Federally supported mentoring programs have been around since the Higher Education Act of 1965, which created student services programs such as Upward Bound, said Stephanie Gordon, vice president for professional development of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. But as colleges and universities face more scrutiny on retention rates, more institutions have launched or expanded mentoring efforts, Gordon said. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:26 - - Permalien [#]

'Academic Urban Legends'

HomeBy Charlie Tyson. Spinach is not an exceptional nutritional source of iron. The leafy green has iron, yes, but not much more than you’d find in other green vegetables. And the plant contains oxalic acid, which inhibits iron absorption. Why, then, do so many people believe spinach boasts such high iron levels? Scholars committed to unmasking spinach’s myths have long offered a story of academic sloppiness. German chemists in the 1930s misplaced a decimal point, the story goes. They thus overestimated the plant’s iron content tenfold. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:25 - - Permalien [#]

Optimistic Fund-Raisers

HomeBy Ry Rivard. Top college fund-raisers are mostly optimistic about the future, but the poor colleges are getting poorer, according to a new survey of advancement officials at 335 North American institutions. The survey is by Academic Impressions, which provides training conferences and webinars to higher education leaders. The survey, conducted online in June, focused on the most typical type of endowment fund: the small kind. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:24 - - Permalien [#]

Punished for Its Mission?

HomeBy Ry Rivard. New College of Florida is a public institution with small classes and close faculty-student interaction in a state where most students attend mammoth universities with large classes. It attracts and graduates high-quality students, and it's known for its rigorous curriculum. But so far it has come out a loser under the state’s new performance funding plan. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:23 - - Permalien [#]


After the First Contract

HomeBy Colleen Flaherty. How can adjunct unions keep their members engaged after their first contracts have been negotiated? And what’s next on various higher education unions’ agendas? Those and other questions were the focus of a session on adjunct organizing at the Coalition of Contingent Academic Labor conference, or COCAL, here Tuesday. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:22 - - Permalien [#]

No More 'Collective Begging'

HomeBy Colleen Flaherty. If adjuncts want more workplace rights, they have to take them. That message was echoed throughout a discussion on non-tenure-track faculty rights here Monday at the Coalition of Contingent Academic Labor, or COCAL, conference. It's being held this week at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:21 - - Permalien [#]

Selectivity and Graduation Rates

HomeBy Scott Jaschik. Educators continue to debate "undermatching" -- the idea that many talented low-income students do not even apply to, let alone enroll at, the most competitive institutions to which they could gain admission. In the last two years, many prominent researchers have endorsed the undermatching thesis, which has attracted attention at the White House. But other researchers have published studies that have cast doubt on it. A paper being published today in American Educational Research Journal belongs in that latter group. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:20 - - Permalien [#]

A for Effort

HomeBy Scott Jaschik. Grade inflation was the subject of scathing articles a decade ago, with educators and others poking fun at elite colleges and universities where merit seemed to have been replaced with a Lake Wobegon attitude that everyone was above average -- well above average in fact. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:18 - - Permalien [#]

Sex, Lies, Economists

HomeBy Holly Else for Times Higher Education. A small proportion of European economists have confessed to “acceptance or offering of sex” in exchange for co-authorship or promotion, as well as owning up to fabricating or manipulating data. A survey of about 400 economists, conducted among members of the European Economic Association on an anonymous basis, is analyzed in the article "Scientific Misbehavior in Economics,” currently in press for the journal Research Policy. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 07:17 - - Permalien [#]