23 mars 2014

Higher education shouldn't be a market. No wonder tuition fees are failing

The Guardian homeBy . All that pain, all that argument, to bring in the £9,000 fees cap – now it's close to costing us more than it's made. So why bother? Today, as the phrase goes, will be a good day to bury bad news. What to do about Vladimir Putin? What happened to flight MH370? And what kind of hash has George Osborne made of people's pensions? But for all that, there is subterranean scandal that should not pass unnoticed. The highly contentious student loans system is unravelling. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:57 - - Permalien [#]


Education should be a right for all

The Guardian homeWe believe that education, like healthcare, is a fundamental social good, one that benefits both individual students and society as a whole (Report, 21 March). We believe that everyone should have an equal right, during a formative period of their lives, to pursue their own interests for their own sake. The ability to exercise this right should not be filtered by wealth and privilege, or be determined by the current priorities of the labour market. Still less should it be decided by those who might profit from any imminent increase in student debt, or from the erosion of staff pay and conditions. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:55 - - Permalien [#]

Tuition fees: teetering on the brink

The Guardian homeEditorial. New official forecasts suggest that write-off costs have reached 45% of the £10bn paid out in student loans each year. It is generally assumed that when Nick Clegg dies, or if his Liberal Democrats suffer a comparable fate at the May 2015 election, the words "tuition fees" will be found engraved on his heart. But now it seems he won't be alone. On the latest calculations, the whole system of student funding introduced by the coalition four years ago – when the maximum permissible university tuition fee was hoicked up from £3,000 to £9,000 – is in serious trouble. In essence, the system in England requires graduates, once they're earning £21,000 a year, to repay their fees over a 30-year period. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:54 - - Permalien [#]

Is pressure on postdocs leading to 'massaged' research?

The Guardian homeBy Anonymous academic. Merciless competition for jobs and funds pushes some researchers to spin data in the eternal quest for success. Academics are rated on how many publications we produce, how often we publish, and in which journals and our CVs boast of every printed word. It all amounts to one thing: publish or perish. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:53 - - Permalien [#]

Move over, Stem: why the world needs humanities graduates

The Guardian homeBy Paul Smith. Global problems can't be resolved without a humanities perspective, so academics need to get out into the world and make the case for their subject. Business leaders called last week for subsidies for UK science and maths degrees to boost graduate numbers. Supporters of the humanities may be alarmed – but they need to work harder promote the unique skills of their graduates, the British Council's director in the US argues. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:51 - - Permalien [#]
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Moocs: students in the global south are wary of a 'sage on the stage'

The Guardian homeBy . Unless universities adapt the curriculum to suit the needs of students in emerging economies, free online courses will have no relevance. Free online courses, known by the acronym Moocs (massive open online courses), have the potential to educate anyone, anywhere and reach the world's under-served. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:50 - - Permalien [#]

How to stay sane through a PhD: get survival tips from fellow students

The Guardian homeBy Inez von Weitershausen. High fliers are being made miserable by PhD study, but it's best to learn from colleagues rather than wait for universities to solve the problem. You might have chosen to take a look at this blog because you are currently feeling overwhelmed by your PhD, or perhaps you just know of someone who is. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:48 - - Permalien [#]

Researching the Recent Past Online

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/profhacker-45.pngBy . [This is a guest post by Dan Royles, a lecturer at the University of Angers in western France, where he teaches American Studies and English as a foreign language. He's previously written on "Digital Workflows for the Archives" for ProfHacker. You can find him online at danroyles.com, or follow him on Twitter at @danroyles.--@JBJ]
When I was writing my dissertation on African American AIDS activism, I ran into the problem that plagues many historians of the recent past: lack of archival sources. I had identified a handful of interesting stories to anchor my five chapters, but several of them involved organizations from the 1990s and 2000s that had left little in way of a paper trail. I solved some of my problem with an oral history project, which filled in some major gaps while creating a set of resources that will be useful for the future. However, I didn’t want to rely on oral histories alone. Memory is faulty, and although the narrative choices that people make in telling their stories are often instructive, without a set of corroborating sources it can be hard to piece together even a rough chronology of what “actually” happened. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:53 - - Permalien [#]

Join the Global Women Write In #GWWI on Wikipedia Tomorrow!

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/profhacker-45.pngBy . Despite being open to anyone to edit, Wikipedia has been criticized for its gender gap. To help remedy this, Postcolonial Digital Humanities is organizing a Global Women Write-In (#GWWI) on Wikipedia all-day tomorrow on March 18! More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:51 - - Permalien [#]

Back to (GTD) Basics: The Two-Minute Rule

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/profhacker-45.pngBy . When you’re deciding what needs to be done next on a project, or in response to an email, or about that flashing light on your car’s dashboard, how do you decide if it’s something to do right away or something to put on your list for later? Do you have a bunch of emails sitting your inbox that you keep meaning to respond to but you haven’t managed to get around to them yet? The two-minute rule might help. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 10:50 - - Permalien [#]