nippon.comBy Amano Ikuo. Japan’s universities have experienced a huge number of systemic and organizational reforms over the last 20 years. Amano Ikuo, professor emeritus at the University of Tokyo, looks back on the origins of the reforms as a response to globalization and ahead to the problems that still need to be addressed.
More than half a century after a new system of tertiary education began during the American occupation following World War II, Japan’s universities and colleges are once again in the throes of major reforms. The tempest of change that started in the early 1990s continues to blow through the world of higher education. What are the reasons for this major shakeup of the country’s higher education system? In this article, I want to look at the six factors I believe are most responsible: three international megatrends and three factors specific to conditions in Japan. More...