02 mars 2014

From the Archives: Using Twitter

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/profhacker-45.pngBy . The essential ProfHacker introduction to Twitter is Ryan’s appropriately titled post, How to Start Tweeting (and Why You Might Want To). He covers all the basics, including creating your profile, using lists, and following hashtags. But we’ve written quite a few other posts about this popular social media platform. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:39 - - Permalien [#]


Basecamp Announces Free Accounts for Teachers

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/profhacker-45.pngBy George Williams. Back in 2011, Heather wrote a great post about using the project management web service Basecamp for organizing student research. In 2012, however, Basecamp eliminated the option to maintain a free account, and their least expensive expensive paid plan is $20. That’s a perfectly understandable decision, of course, but for the individual teacher, the change might inspire a move to one of their competitors with free account options, such as Trello. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:36 - - Permalien [#]

40 Android Apps for Teaching and Learning

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/profhacker-45.pngBy George Williams. A few weeks ago I invited readers to share their favorite iPad apps for the classroom, and the comments section features several good suggestions. Last week I asked readers to share their favorite Android apps for the classroom, and… well… we didn’t end up with nearly as many suggestions. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:34 - - Permalien [#]

Keeping Your Offsite Twitter Archive Fresh: A Fix

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/profhacker-45.pngBy . A year ago I wrote about Martin Hawksey‘s awesome hack that keeps your offsite Twitter archive fresh. This tool takes your Twitter archive (a complete set of your tweets, which you can request from your Twitter settings) and then daily adds your latest tweets using a Google Apps script. The archive resides in Google Drive as a regular web page. For example, here’s my archive. Unfortunately, sometime in December 2013, Google changed something with its scripting language, and this broke many instances of Martin’s hack. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:33 - - Permalien [#]

Only Connect—or Don’t, for a Change

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy Geoffrey Pullum. When working with my students—Germans and other nonnative English speakers—on papers and theses, I can often spot those who have taken an academic writing class by the number of conjunctive adverbs that litter the work. My impulse is to cut all these therefores, consequentlys, and additionallys, though I recognize their appeal. When I’m working as a journalist, I often need to write quick articles that rely heavily on conjunctive adverbs and conjunctions (but, nor) to pull readers through the twists and turns of the story; the more time I’ve got to craft a piece, the more confident I become in barer sentences to provide that drama. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:30 - - Permalien [#]


Real-Time Automated Essay Writing?

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/linguafranca-45.pngBy Geoffrey Pullum. When I first tried EssayTyper, for just a moment it chilled my blood. Of course, it’s just a little joke; but I hope students everywhere will be sophisticated enough to see that, because a person who was unusually naive, lazy, and ignorant just might mistake it for a computer program that will enable you to type out custom-designed essays on selected academic topics, even topics you know nothing about, even if you can’t type. The EssayTyper home page presents a box saying. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:28 - - Permalien [#]

Garden-Variety Clichés

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/icons/lingua-franca-nameplate.pngBy Allan Metcalf. Clichés are something else. By definition, they are weeds in the gardens of language. No more, no less. And there’s the rub. Clichés are a whole different ballgame.
No plants are weeds by nature or by definition. They are weeds if and only if a particular gardener doesn’t want them around. One man’s uprooted dandelion is another man’s dandelion soup. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:26 - - Permalien [#]

Pedal to the Medal

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/icons/lingua-franca-nameplate.pngBy William Germano. The manufactured snow has barely melted at the Sochi Winter Olympics, but I’ll take a moment to reflect on what I thought was the rise of the verb to medal, meaning of course to win gold, silver, or bronze in Olympic competition. If  you’re an  Olympic athlete, you want to medal. You want to medal even more than you want to win a medal. If you’re covering the Olympics, you want to use the verb to medal. A lot. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:22 - - Permalien [#]

Autism, Hackers, and the Future of Higher Education

By . As a graduate student in Professor Davidson’s “History and Future of Higher Education” course and a teaching assistant in her similarly titled MOOC, I am interacting with more than 17,000 participants online and encountering them in a surprisingly personal way. Recently, a 19-year-old MOOC participant who self-identified as ADHD and a “hacker of his education” wondered in an online forum why we were dealing with higher education specifically. It is a good and valid question, one that resonates with me deeply and personally. I have two sons with autism. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:19 - - Permalien [#]

We Should Apply the Slow-Food Movement to Higher Education

By . Why take the time to make a loaf of bread? It is simple enough to toss a shiny cellophane bag of bread into the grocery cart instead of taking a couple of hours to mix the ingredients, knead the dough, let it rise, knead it some more, then shape it into the desired form. The process of cooking from scratch and the growing popularity of the slow-food movement are a fitting analogy for the need to redesign and reshape current forms of higher education. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 21:17 - - Permalien [#]