02 mars 2014

Le zoom du mois - Elaboration de la stratégie nationale de l’enseignement supérieur (StraNES)

La lettre du Ministère de l'enseignement supérieur et de la rechercheLa définition d’une stratégie nationale de l’enseignement supérieur (StraNES) est une nouveauté en France, issue de la loi du 22 juillet 2013. La réflexion est menée par un comité d’expertise chargé d’auditionner des personnalités concernées par les enjeux de l’enseignement supérieur français, et de faire la synthèse des propositions qui seront ensuite soumises à la concertation. Remise du rapport à la ministre en juin 2014.
La stratégie nationale de l'enseignement supérieur (StraNES).
Installation du comité pour la stratégie nationale de l'enseignement supérieur.
Pour consulter cette lettre en ligne, cliquez sur le lien suivant, ou collez-le dans votre navigateur : http://www.enseignementsup-recherche.gouv.fr/pid25452/panorama.html.

Posté par pcassuto à 01:44 - - Permalien [#]


Morocco: highlighting progress in non-formal education

http://www.enpi-info.eu/img/banner.jpgThe Moroccan Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training, in collaboration with the European Union, is organising a seminar on “the future of non-formal education: stakes and challenges”, on 21 and 22 February in Rabat. The event aims to highlight the new strategy of non-formal education as well as the results and recommendations of EU technical assistance on this matter. Representatives of ministries and national and international bodies, as well as researchers, experts, civil society associations and young beneficiaries will take part. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:32 - - Permalien [#]
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UALL 2014 Annual Conference - Conference Programme Including Workshop Seminars

The Universities Association for Lifelong LearningTransforming pedagogy? Flexible learning, teaching and innovation in the 21st century
9-11 April at University of London, Senate House
The updated Conference Programme with the Workshop Seminars is now available.  We are delighted to have such a full and varied programme, which I hope you agree offers a fascinating range of approaches to our theme.
We have international interest in the Conference, and a number of delegates already confirmed, including from our sister associations UPCEA (USA) and CAUCE (Canada). Following the success of 2013 we have arranged another International Panel for Friday morning. Our keynote speakers are now confirmed: Professor Diana Laurillard, and Professor Penny Jane Burke, and Dr Alison Le Cornu from the Higher Education Academy (HEA). The HEA are, incidentally, interested in working with UALL on the lifelong learning dimensions of flexible pedagogy.
We have two book launches at the Conference on the Wednesday and Thursday evenings.  The Drinks Reception and Conference Dinner will be held at The Grand Connaught Rooms on the Thursday evening. We have also been offered their top menu - engagingly known as the 'Titanic Menu'. At the Dinner there will also be the 'UALL Awards Ceremony' where we make the UALL Award for 2014.  We have an excellent shortlist of submissions for the Award.
Please book your place and return the Registration Form as soon as possible.
If you require further information, please contact Lucy Bate.

Posté par pcassuto à 01:29 - - Permalien [#]
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The QS Subject Rankings: Harvard and MIT Dominant

http://www.ireg-observatory.org/templates/sub_business2/images/ireg_top2013.pngQuacquarelli Symonds (QS) have published their 2014 subject rankings, based on data collected for the 2013 World University Rankings. Altogether 30 subjects have been ranked.
These rankings are receiving a lot of international attention but they are also likely to be controversial, partly because of their reliance on a subjective academic survey. The scores are based on four indicators: a survey of academic opinion, a survey of graduate employers, citations per paper and the H-index, which measures quantity and quality of research. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:25 - - Permalien [#]

Controversy over Quality of Indian Universities

http://www.ireg-observatory.org/templates/sub_business2/images/ireg_top2013.pngThe Governor of Odisha State in India has expressed his concern over the poor quality of Indian Universities. His remarks came at the opening of the annual meeting of the Association of Indian Universities at KIIT University Bhubaneswar and have been widely reported in the Indian media. He said, “Despite an ever-growing number of varsities, quality education is still a dream. We have over 650 universities, 16 National Institutes of Technology and 30 lakh [100,000] colleges across the country. But, we have sacrificed quality in our mad scramble for quantity.”
This is just the latest in a series of complaints and arguments about the deficiencies of  higher education in India and its neighbours, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Such complaints have been voiced for three or four decades but recently the issue has intensified because of the failure of any Indian university to make it into  the top 200 of the three best known international rankings, QS, Times Higher Education and the Academic Ranking of World Universities produced by Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Only one Indian institution reached the top 500 of the Shanghai rankings while a handful were found at the lower levels of the world rankings. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:22 - - Permalien [#]


Agility: a crucial capability for universities in times of disruptive change and innovation

The latest issue of Australian Universities' Review, vol. 56, no. 1, is now available online. eBook: http://issuu.com/nteu/docs/aur_56-01.
By Sheila Mukerjee, La Trobe University. Agility: a crucial capability for universities in times of disruptive change and innovation (Australian Universities' Review, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 56-60)
Government funding cuts have provided a new impetus to Australian universities to re-examine their value proposition and corporate focus. While the sector has gone through waves of change in recent times, institutions are now scrambling for their place in a highly competitive market. Institutions explore new revenue opportunities and digital transformation to achieve cost savings and efficiencies. The digital world is driving innovation and continuous change at such a rapid and random rate that universities are struggling to keep up with demand.
Introduction
The film, music, newspaper and retail industries – among many others – have already experienced the impact of the digital revolution and experienced the need to adapt or perish in the face of such unprecedented change and swing in consumer preferences. White (2013), a former journalist who experienced this impact on the print media first hand, warns of seeing the same warning signs of technology’s impact on the higher education sector and the consequences of ignoring them. Universities have been warned to overhaul or perish (Hare, 2012).
Given the growing take up of online education, views are being expressed about the longevity and viability of higher education institutions (Coy, 2013). It is becoming increasingly clear that business models and corporate focus need to be reframed and renewed to ensure that they are relevant to current and future markets and more importantly, will stand the test of time and still exist to meet the ongoing demand and challenges of the times. Over the years, the higher education sector has faced a barrage of disruptions and reforms as a result of government reform, market demand and volatility, economic pressures and technological innovation. Recent innovations to open up education, including Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), blended learning, collaborative models and free education with elite universities, have changed the landscape of the education sector (Marques, 2013; Valiathan, 2002; Associated Press, 2013). These innovations have placed the sector on high alert to the disruptive force of the digital revolution.
In Australia, recent government announcements about funding cuts and proposed reforms to the university funding model (Matchett, 2013; Hurst & Tovey, 2013) have compounded the situation. Now, more than ever, business models are needed that have strategic foresight capability underpinned by corporate and business agility to respond and adapt to change with minimum latency. Agility is an increasingly crucial factor for survival in this new throwaway paradigm of innovation upon innovation.
What is meant by agility in an organisational and operational sense? Agility encompasses the ability to respond and adapt to change in a timely manner so that change quickly becomes the norm for the organisation. Sambamurthy et al. (2003, p. 238) define agility in the context of business success as ‘the ability to detect and seize market opportunities with speed and surprise’. An agile organisation has this sense of opportunistic sensitivity and adaptability embedded in its strategic and operational DNA.
Many facets of agility as an organisational capability have been researched and reported. Doz and Kosonen (2010) provide a framework for strategic agility and corresponding leadership actions that accelerate the process of business transformation and renewal. Goodhue et al. (2009) published their findings of the effectiveness of enterprise systems in addressing business agility. Systems and hardware agility are significant players in today’s technology-driven businesses. Sambamurthy et al. (2003) discuss the strategic role of IT investments and capabilities in shaping agility in organisations. They also present an argument that agility comprises the three interrelated capabilities of customer agility, partnering agility and operational agility. Cultural agility, espoused by Caligiuri (2013), is another interesting perspective of agility that relates to the professional working in cross-cultural environments. Being culturally agile in a globalised market is a definite advantage in successfully negotiating, operating and delivering outcomes under foreign domains. The sections that follow describe these facets of agility in greater detail and relate these capabilities to the university sector as it seeks to re-imagine, transform and innovate. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:19 - - Permalien [#]

Expectations of student learning quality - An introductory study

The latest issue of Australian Universities' Review, vol. 56, no. 1, is now available online. eBook: http://issuu.com/nteu/docs/aur_56-01.
By Dennis Bryant, University of Canberra. Expectations of student learning quality - An introductory study (Australian Universities' Review, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 32-38)
Without a direct measure of learning, universities and lecturers do not have reliable evidence of changes, past or present, in the academic
merit of a unit. By using grade data to develop a variable called Academic Merit, all university units were measured for their percentages
of academic merit over one semester at an Australian teaching-intensive regional university. Although the results revealed units with
excellent percentages, there were others with percentages that were other than excellent. The implication is that an opportunity exists to
understand the quality of the learning merit in those units with a view to enhancing student academic learning.
Introduction
Discussions in higher education that uncritically link teaching and learning into a co-joined mass are simplistic in their acceptance of the assumption that educational improvements in one co-joined principal, stereotypically, the teaching principal, imply that those improvements affect equally the other co-joined principal, here, learning. In the co-joined teaching and learning model, quality assurance efforts that raise the quality of teaching by one point would be expected to raise the quality of learning by a similar margin of one point. Curiously, there is a dearth of published literature that empirically supports the teaching and learning co-joined model’s assumption of equivalent co-growth. However, there are claims, not merely against an assumed equivalence of teaching improvements to learning result:gain ratios, but more dramatically against the nature of some co-joined educational models. Biggs (2001) presents a number of impediments to the quality feasibility of cojoined models, arguing that educational success requires the alignment of not two but three principals, with the third principal being assessment. The Biggs constructive alignment model promises that adherence to teaching and assessment will result in student learning quality excellence; however, in both models the missing ingredient is how best to detect student learning quality excellence (abbreviated hereafter as merit), given that students start from different bases.
A commonly used method of detecting learning merit is to rely on surveys that measure a surrogate variable in place of directly measuring learning merit. In survey devices (Ramsden, 1991), students are invited to reflect on their satisfaction with teaching, from which results are extracted student perceptions of learning. But this approach relies on simplistic co-joined model assumptions and has critics (Denson et al., 2010; Edstrom, 2008; Shevlin et al., 2000).
An alternative approach is to eschew surrogate measures in favour of direct measures. Using a non-surrogate approach with an emphasis on empirical learning results, Bryant (2013a) proposed a variable called ‘academic merit’, whose values were ‘no merit shown’ and ‘merit shown’. A no merit shown value refers to students who achieved either a failure grade or a P (pass) grade. While it is intuitive that a failure grade be interpreted Discussions in higher education that uncritically link teaching and learning into a co-joined mass are simplistic in their acceptance of the assumption that educational improvements in one co-joined principal, stereotypically, the teaching principal, imply that those improvements affect equally the other co-joined principal, here, learning. In the co-joined teaching and learning model, quality assurance efforts that raise the quality of teaching by one point would be expected to raise the quality of learning by a similar margin of one point. Curiously, there is a dearth of published literature that empirically supports the teaching and learning co-joined model’s assumption of equivalent co-growth. However, there are claims, not merely against an assumed equivalence of teaching improvements to learning result:gain ratios, but more dramatically against the nature of some co-joined educational models. Biggs (2001) presents a number of impediments to the quality feasibility of cojoined models, arguing that educational success requires the alignment of not two but three principals, with the third principal being assessment. The Biggs constructive alignment model promises that adherence to teaching and assessment will result in student learning quality excellence; however, in both models the missing ingredient is how best to detect student learning quality excellence (abbreviated hereafter as merit), given that students start from different bases. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:09 - - Permalien [#]

Universities Australia conference from the casual academic perspective

http://www.nteu.org.au//var/files/thumbs/a780532dd116f8da145bac8c4c7961bc_default_w80_.jpgBy Jeannie Rea. With Universities Australia’s 2014 Higher Education Conference starting today, we are happy to also welcome a new social media project that focuses upon higher education issues from casual, adjunct and sessional academic perspectives. This will be undertaken during the Universities Australia conference and beyond.
We would encourage casual and sessional members to follow the Twitter conversation in the next two days via the hashtag #auscasuals, and if you want to find out more about the organisers, take a look at the website and blog: http://actualcasuals.wordpress.com/. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:59 - - Permalien [#]

Joint study programmes: the most integrated form for internationalisation

By Annika Sundback-Lindroos. As Europe struggles with unemployment and economic downturn, the focus of the higher education sector should be on creating new knowledge to support innovation and growth. Why, then, is there so much emphasis being put on developing and implementing time- and resource-consuming joint academic programmes? Could it be that academic added value and student learning outcomes can be reached through a joint international curriculum with integrated mobility, ie, through joint study programmes?
Joint study programmes have long been both academically and politically prioritised within the European Higher Education Arena (EHEA). They were first mentioned in relation to the inter-ministerial Bologna Process in 2001, since joint study programmes are directly linked to Bologna action lines of mobility, joint curriculum development and quality assurance. Today, the Bologna Process is one of the main voluntary processes at European level, and is implemented in the 47 EHEA states. The latest Bologna meeting resulted in the Bucharest Communiqué, stating: “We encourage higher education institutions to further develop joint programmes and degrees as part of a wider EHEA approach. We will examine national practices as a way to dismantle obstacles to cooperation and mobility.” More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:52 - - Permalien [#]

Expanding PISA’s circle of influence

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRP4qIrraW46oa4crCboqTzadd3IE4yTumRAbMvuvR527xT31xml_tozi4By Barbara Ischinger Director for Education and Skills and Alejandro Gomez Palma, Analyst, PISA for Development. The enormous worldwide interest in the PISA 2012 results, which were released last December, showed that PISA is now widely accepted as the best measure of student performance we have – and one of the best sources of data that can be used to inform policy decisions about how to improve education systems. Sixty-five countries and economies participated in PISA 2012, but that leaves well over 100 others that either chose not to or believe that participation is out of their reach. We hope that that’s going to change soon.
We’ve just returned from Ecuador where the government agreed – with a sense of pride that was palpable – to participate in our pilot PISA for Development initiative. Eight Latin American countries participated in the latest round of PISA 2012 and we’re keen to add to that number. We’ve briefly mentioned the PISA for Development project in earlier blogs, but now that countries are signing on, we want to describe in more detail what it is and what it means, both for the OECD and for the countries involved. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:45 - - Permalien [#]