23 février 2014

Generation Y: why young job seekers want more than money

The Guardian homeBy . New research shows Millennials are less interested in financial security and more concerned with job fulfilment. Employment prospects are looking up for this year's university-leavers, with graduate recruitment on the rise and starting salaries higher than the UK average. However, research shows that for the youngest generation entering the workplace, financial security is not what matters most. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 22:23 - - Permalien [#]


Mooc fans step out of the shadows

The Guardian homeBy . Surprising data from the first wave of massive open online courses show most students are male, educated and living in a developed country. When the higher education sector pioneered massive open online courses (or Moocs, as they are more commonly known) it was heralded as an exciting step towards accessible education for all. For the first time, access to university-level education was no longer dependent on merit or means but simply on enthusiasm and commitment. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 22:09 - - Permalien [#]

OFT warns universities about sanctions on students in debt

The Guardian homeBy . Practice of preventing students with non-tuition fee debts from graduating may breach consumer laws, watchdog says. The Office of Fair Trading has written to more than 170 universities and other higher education groups warning that the widespread practice of stopping students graduating or continuing with their course if they owe money over issues such as late library books or childcare services could breach consumer laws. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 22:07 - - Permalien [#]

Voices From The Past Reflecting On The Future (Number 5): Status & The Inferiority Complex

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/ubiquitouslibrarian-45.pngBy Brian Mathews. Continuing the Voices Series:
There was an interesting discussion by the College Library Advisory Board at the 1937 annual meeting of the American Library Association. This one isn’t a prediction on the future, but it definitely touches on a conversation that we’re still having today. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:37 - - Permalien [#]

Voices From The Past Reflecting On The Future (Number 4): Dorothy Sinclair, Reference & Automation

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/ubiquitouslibrarian-45.pngBy Brian Mathews. I’m interested in the impact of automation on libraries. It makes sense to look at the topic from the collections lens, but I’m really fascinated by the service perspective. In the 1960’s we have Licklider talking about an Intergalactic Network of Computers and an electronic commons open to all. He gives The Mother of All Demos showing video conferencing, hypertext, word processing, dynamic file linking, and a collaborative real-time editor – essentially launching a computer revolution. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:36 - - Permalien [#]


Voices From The Past Reflecting On The Future (Number 3): Melvil Dewey & Our Book Fetish

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/ubiquitouslibrarian-45.pngBy Brian Mathews. Melvil Dewey needs no introduction. He is a household name and probably the most famous librarian ever… after Nancy Pearl. Much as been written about Dewey’s accomplishments as well as his scandals, but today I wanted to share a quote from a talk he gave at ALA Annual in 1926. Charles Beldon, who I profiled earlier in this series, invited Dewey to imagine the next fifty years. This is what he had to share: Out Next Half-Century. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:35 - - Permalien [#]

Voices From The Past Reflecting On The Future (Number 2): Angus Snead Macdonald, User Experience Pioneer

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/ubiquitouslibrarian-45.pngBy Brian Mathews. I’m providing space this week to voices from the past and highlighting bold speculations about the future of libraries. Today I want to showcase Angus Snead Macdonald. He was the CEO of a library stacks company that developed standardized shelving. This innovation greatly improved planning since librarians could more easily quantify the physical size of their collections. The stacks were also designed to be lightweight and flexible in order to be moved around and adjusted accordingly. In 1933 he provided The Library Journal with a vision for the future. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:34 - - Permalien [#]

Voices From The Past Reflecting On The Future (Number 1): Charles Beldon & The Unification of Knowledge

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/ubiquitouslibrarian-45.pngBy Brian Mathews. Are we preoccupied with the future? There appears to be a steady stream of articles, books, blog posts, webinars, conference presentations, and other media centered on this theme. It seems we are all fairly focused on what’s next.
I’m guilty myself; the future can be intoxicating. This week I want to offer perspective from a different set of voices. A recent project took me deep into the archives of library lit and along the way I discovered some interesting speculation about the future from librarians in the past. Each day this week I’ll highlight a different visionary who helped shape the profession. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:33 - - Permalien [#]

The Rise of ‘Educational Sovereignty’

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/icons/worldwise-nameplate.gifBy Jason Lane and Kevin Kinser. For the past several decades, many international branch campuses have operated without much oversight from their home countries and with a sense of diplomatic immunity in their host countries. Recently, however, some countries are following the lead of Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and Singapore, and have created structures to regulate foreign education providers within their borders, often giving them special status in the national education system. But, as part of this development, we’ve noticed an odd and persistent resistance to the “branch campus” label. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:30 - - Permalien [#]

In Search of a Principled Stance on Toleration and Acceptance

By . Opinions are not hard to come by, but merely having a position is not enough. The great achievement is in having a point of view that is defensible, that does not buckle under the pressure of scrutiny. The same is true of belief systems. Most people are   interested not only in believing things, but in believing things that are true. The distinction between opinions and correct opinions, beliefs and true beliefs, has important implications, one of which is denying that all beliefs are on an equal footing. Likewise we should reject, without hesitancy or shame, the idea that all beliefs are equally deserving of respect. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 19:29 - - Permalien [#]