26 janvier 2014

Celebrating Successes and Moving Forward

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/large/public/CRW.jpgBy Lee Skallerup Bessette. First off, I’d like to thank everyone for such a warm and supportive reception to my piece last week, particularly on social media. On Facebook and Twitter, you shared your own stories alongside my own, which I appreciate. It’s still strange, however, to be feted as a leading activist for adjuncts and contingent labor; there are so many other people, on the ground, who have been advocating, agitating, and organizing on behalf of adjuncts, but their work goes unnoticed nationally. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:55 - - Permalien [#]


Designing (for) Education

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/StratEDgy%20Graphic%20Resized.jpg?itok=kIrUoz70By Margaret Andrews. In addition to designing and implementing several other new initiatives, I’ve been working with Dave Power to put together a two-day Design Thinking Workshop that launches in April of this year. The materials we’ve found to produce the program have been phenomenal (send me an email if you’d like the working list – or would like to contribute to the list), as have been some of the examples we’ve come across for both the outcome of and need for some very creative thinking. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:54 - - Permalien [#]

Time to Fledge Cornell's Nest!

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/law.jpg?itok=7sode5LvBy Tracy Mitrano. I am retiring from my position at Cornell University.  In 1991, I began my career there as a visiting assistant professor in Human Development of the School of Human Ecology (filling in for Joan Brumberg’s sabbatical), then attended the law school, and upon graduation began teaching part time (while I was caring for parents and raising my boys) back in Human Development (filling in this time for Phyllis Moen) before taking the position in IT on April 1, 2001.  I will forever be grateful to Steve Worona and Polley McClure for taking a chance on me.  After all, what did I know about the Internet?  (Turns out enough to get my feet wet, thanks to my partner at the time, Bill Schaff, an electrical engineer at Cornell, who gave me a modem almost the very day the Internet went public, and the inspired former Dean and Professor of Law, Peter Martin, of the Legal Information Institute.) Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:52 - - Permalien [#]

When the Internet Hates You

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/JustVisitingLogo_white.jpg?itok=K5uvzo_-By John Warner. Thanks to Twitter, if you screw up these days, you’re going to hear about it.
It happened to me a year and a half ago when, as editor at large of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, I helped initiate a “comic contest.” The idea was patterned on our longstanding and successful columnist contest, through which we add new contributing writers to our stable each year. Many of those writers have gone on to bigger and better things like book and television deals, and I figured the same would work for comics. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:50 - - Permalien [#]

Systems and words and meanings

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/green.jpg?itok=D8D3DXB7By G. Rendell. Two recent conversations are in the process of melding in my mind.  (No Vulcan required.)  One of them was with an MD, and the other with a university sustainability officer. Chatting with the MD, the subject of "quality" came up.  She's a solo practitioner, working with and in -- but not as an employee of -- a large hospital.  Apparently, the hospital is intent on absorbing most or all of the solo and small group practices associated with it, under the pretext of improving quality.  I say "pretext", because their argument is that quality is a function of the number of ways a hands-on practitioner's activities get recorded and scrutinized.  The number of forms that get filled out.  The number of non-MDs passing judgment on what MDs do.  Without apparent reference to what outcomes are produced or what needs and expectations satisfied.  "Quality", in such a context, sounds perilously close to economic efficiency; the concepts aren't inherently in conflict, but neither are they inherently identical. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:46 - - Permalien [#]


Making the Most of Your Department's Hiring Process

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/Screen%20Shot%202011-12-12%20at%2012.29.48%20PM.png?itok=ITDqfJNPBy Kelly Hanson. If you've been following academics on Twitter of late, you may have noticed an outpouring of feelings this month surrounding the annual MLA Convention, the conference for academics in the modern languages. There is even an entire Twitter feed dedicated to venting such feelings. Over the past month, these digital debates have ranged from the adjunctification of academic labor to the future of the humanities. Many of the conversations centered on what were often viewed as unfair hiring practices employed by universities, especially some of the larger research universities; how MLA (or perhaps other large academic conventions) often works as a metonym for the uneven and sometimes hostile terrain that is the academic job market; and how conferences might better serve us sans job interviews. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:43 - - Permalien [#]

7 Productivity Apps for the New Year

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/Screen%20Shot%202011-12-12%20at%2012.29.48%20PM.png?itok=ITDqfJNPBy GradHacker. As classes resume session, and as graduate coursework ramps up (or settles down), you might be finding yourself in the midst of a new schedule, new routines, trying to make sense of where you need to be and when, and what work needs to be done before your next teaching day or class meeting. It always took me (Liz) at least three weeks of a new semester to settle into a “groove” of sorts—to know what was happening when, and to establish blocks of time for various tasks throughout the week. And for me (Emily), the first year of graduate school was about learning to work, read, and write more efficiently, and to break massive tasks into manageable pieces. The second year has been about trying to put those lessons into practice. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:42 - - Permalien [#]

Innovative BU Confab

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/large/public/student_affairs_and_technology_blog_header.jpgBy Eric Stoller. Kenn Elmore, Dean of Students at Boston University, does not mess around. When he issues a challenge, he says his piece, drops the mic, and waits for our response. For the past couple of years, Elmore and BU have hosted a student affairs conference called "Confab." More of a conversation than a lecture, Confab is billed as "an old-school group convo." This year's event is scheduled for February 21 and it is definitely going to challenge attendees and perhaps nudge a large portion of the student affairs profession. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:40 - - Permalien [#]

Books Are For Use

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/blog_landing/public/library_babel_fish_blog_header.jpg?itok=qNL3hM7KBy Barbara Fister. Scratch a librarian and you're likely to find some Ranganathan. The "five laws of library science" were first formulated by Indian librarian S. R. Ranganathan in 1931, but even today many fledgling librarians can recite them by heart. They're short, and they're pretty sweet. They begin with the proposition that "books are for use." Ranganathan was emphasizing the use of books over their protection at a time when open stacks were a bit radical. Today, it's still a meaningful phrase. Books shouldn't be a ticket required for a steady job or a badge of scholarly distinction. They should be read. They should be used. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:30 - - Permalien [#]

Alexander the MOOC

By Guy MacLean Rogers. 2013 was undoubtedly the year of the MOOC. My year of the MOOC however was way back in 1999. In that year the Global Education Network (GEN) in New York City chose my Wellesley College history course about Alexander the Great to be their first online course. I subsequently spent many weeks high up in Carnegie Towers on West 57st Street in mid-town Manhattan filming lecture modules, designing inter-active battle sequences, and writing computer-graded exams. It was a fantastic experience. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:23 - - Permalien [#]