29 octobre 2013

Who Earns More: Professor or Fry Cook?

 

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/the-conversation-logo1-45.pngBy Alberto A. Martinez. The high cost of college makes people think that most faculty are overpaid. Let me debunk this myth. Nearly all funds from recent tuition hikes, state-allocation increments, and record-breaking fund raising do not go to most educators. I’m a tenured professor of history of science and mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin. I finished high school 25 years ago. What if instead of attending college I had worked at McDonald’s? More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:49 - - Permalien [#]


Don’t Call Us Rock Stars

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/the-conversation-logo1-45.pngBy Kevin Werbach. Ah, the life of a superprofessor. Since I started teaching a massive open online course, I’ve been called “Internet royalty” by the Financial Times and been told I had great skin on the public-radio show Marketplace. This must be what the edX president Anant Agarwal meant when, responding to concerns that MOOCs were overhyped, he asked, “What better to hype than education? For the first time, you’re going to make the teacher a rock star” (Information Week). More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:45 - - Permalien [#]

For Disruption, MOOCs Beat Open-Access Journals, Scholar Says

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/wiredcampus-45.pngBy Megan O'Neil. MOOCs are more disruptive to higher education than open-access megajournals are, in part because of structural protections in the scholarly-publishing world and because some policy makers are pushing massive open online courses as a means to increase productivity, a professor argues in a new article on open-access alternatives in higher education. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:40 - - Permalien [#]

‘The Zuckerberg Files’: New Scholarly Archive Scrutinizes Facebook CEO

 

 

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/icons/wired-campus-nameplate.gifBy Marc Parry. In 2010 two privacy scholars published an op-ed criticizing the “Machiavellian” public-relations methods of tech companies like Facebook. They analyzed a PR script that may sound familiar to many of Facebook’s 1.2 billion users. A new feature, which shares more personal data with advertisers, is rolled out. A blowback ensues. Then comes the company’s response: minor changes that largely leave the new feature in place, plus reassuring noises like “we are listening to our users.” More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:31 - - Permalien [#]

Applying for Aid Earlier Would Help Needy Students, Report Says

 

 

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/headcount-45.pngBy Justin Doubleday. What if students received their financial-aid packages earlier in the year, giving families more time to prepare to pay for college? That would be possible if financial-aid eligibility were based on two-year-old tax data, rather than the year-old data used now. A report released on Monday by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators considers the implications of switching to the older data, called “prior-prior year” data. The report, which was supported with a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, explores research that was first presented at the association’s conference this past summer, and also makes policy recommendations. More...

 

Posté par pcassuto à 01:27 - - Permalien [#]


Admissions Leaders Weigh Post-‘Fisher’ Questions

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/headcount-45.pngBy Eric Hoover. Neither a victory nor a defeat. That’s how supporters of race-conscious admissions policies have described the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas. At the College Board’s annual conference here this week, admissions officials have discussed that ambiguity. During a session on Fisher, an audience of more than 200 people participated in an on-the-spot survey. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:22 - - Permalien [#]

The ‘Transfer Moment’

 

 

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/headcount-45.pngBy Eric Hoover. Colleges that have long overlooked and undervalued transfer students are thinking more carefully about how to recruit, retain, and graduate them. During a session here on Thursday at the College Board’s annual conference, enrollment experts said the nation was having a long-overdue “transfer moment.”
The recession “has rejiggered the way that families look at higher education,” said Stephen J. Handel, associate vice president for undergraduate admissions for the University of California system. High-school students who wouldn’t have even considered community colleges five years ago are giving them a second look. And more are choosing to start their quest for four-year degrees at two-year colleges. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:20 - - Permalien [#]

Higher-Education Company to Sell Its European Operations

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/icons/bottom-line-header.pngBy Goldie Blumenstyk. The Career Education Corporation has struck a deal to sell its European operations to Apax Partners, a private-equity group, for $267-million in cash, the higher-education company announced on ThursdayMore...

Posté par pcassuto à 01:16 - - Permalien [#]

Fulbright Starts Efforts to Help Alumni Keep Global Ties

http://chronicle.com/img/photos/biz/icons/the-ticker-nameplate.gifBy Ian Wilhelm. Colleen R. O'Neal had what many might call the quintessential Fulbright experience. For years, Ms. O'Neal, who earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology, had studied the emotional health of minority students under duress in the United States. But in 2010 she traveled to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, as part of the U.S. State Department's Fulbright Program.
There she discovered a new passion: studying the stresses faced by the 40,000 or so refugee children from Burma and elsewhere—an underserved population she says she had never heard of before she arrived. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:56 - - Permalien [#]

Young People Let Digital Apps Dictate Their Identities, Say 2 Scholars

 

 

The Chronicle of Higher EducationBy Marc Parry. In the 1950s and 60s, the psychoanalyst Erik Erikson wrote about how people are shaped by a series of crises that must be confronted during different phases of their lives. For adolescents, the crisis involves developing a sense of who they are and what sort of life they aspire to. Back then, "it was seen as a positive development that people could explore different senses of identity before making a long-term commitment to a certain way of being," says Howard Gardner, a Harvard psychologist who studied under Erikson as an undergraduate there in the mid-60s. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:45 - - Permalien [#]