http://o1.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/PATCH/quality/82/resize/26x26/http://hss-prod.hss.aol.com/hss/storage/patch/fdbeba60dca0b6fe213be98d7ba64468By Brooke Donald. America may have legitimate competitive reasons to worry about the number of computer science and engineering graduates from elite Chinese and Indian universities – the figure dwarfs that of U.S. students with similar degrees. But a new book by Stanford researchers and others says that the concern that these countries will develop their own centers of high-tech production and innovation and draw research, development and scholarship away from American shores is still premature.
The research, a multidisciplinary look at the growth of higher education in the world's four largest developing economies – Brazil, Russia, India and China (known collectively as the BRICs) – analyzes the quality of institutions, the quantity of people getting degrees and equal access to education. The book, University Expansion in a Changing Global Economy: Triumph of the BRICS?, is published by Stanford University Press. More...