By Jonathan Rees. Silly me. When George Siemens wrote that “Critiquing MOOCs is now more fashionable than advocating for them,” I didn’t believe him. When the nice people at Slate gave me space in their online magazine to stir up trouble, I figured it was just because trouble attracts attention. But now I’m thinking I’ve been reading the tea leaves totally wrong. ForbesForbes! – , the same magazine that published a particular vicious attack on my Slate article that I won’t link to, has published another contributor’s essay to which I will. It’s entitled, “MOOCs are Toast or at Least Should Be.” Here’s my favorite part:

Many in corporate America have been watching the MOOC phenomenon in academia to see if these massive open online courses hold any promise for executive education. Obviously, I think there are opportunities for corporations in the online learning space, but not as MOOC providers. I believe MOOCs will soon be viewed for what they are, a futile experiment.

This comes on top of a Wired Campus post last week declaring “The MOOC ‘Revolution’ May Not Be as Disruptive as Some Had Imagined,” and a Harvard dude in a piece I read this morning pronouncing that we’re “already in a post-MOOC era.” Read more...