09 juin 2013

Facebook Has Positive Influence on First Generation College Students

HomeA new study finds that use of Facebook may be helping first generation college students apply to college and gain confidence that they will succeed there. The study -- published in the journal Computers and Education -- is by researchers at the University of Michigan and Michigan State University. They surveyed students in a low-income area of Michigan. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:50 - - Permalien [#]


More Fallout at American Academy of Arts and Sciences

HomeLeslie Berlowitz will remove herself from day-to-day activities at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, which she leads, during investigations into how grant applications falsely described her as having a doctorate, The Boston Globe reported. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:46 - - Permalien [#]

The End of French?

HomeBy Rosemary Salomone. In recent weeks, amid all its woes over rising unemployment and a declining economy, France seemed to be embroiled in yet another impending disaster, at least to some French people. The French Assembly was about to vote on a controversial proposal that would ease legal restrictions on courses taught in English at French universities. Watching the positions publicly unfold, I understood the benefits to be gained from more exposure to English particularly for French researchers and students. I further recognized the challenges that France must face in making the new law meet its stated goals. Yet I could not help but lament the potential loss for American and other foreign students studying at French universities. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:44 - - Permalien [#]

The MOOC Synthesizer

HomeBy Scott McLemee. Two recent interventions in the ongoing conversation about massive open online courses (MOOCs) strike me as provocative, in very different ways – and also as curiously neglected, given the interest of what the authors have to say. Perhaps it is a sign of fatigue with the subject? Maybe, but the two articles in question, published a little over a month ago, take up the MOOC question in ways that haven’t previously come to the fore. In calling them to readers’ attention, I don’t aim to influence anyone’s opinion of MOOCs. To attempt that, my own opinion would have to be settled, which it isn’t. There are compelling arguments for assessing them as the pedagogical wave of the future, bringing quality education to everyone, or as a passing fad, possibly in the nature of an economic bubble. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:40 - - Permalien [#]

What We Talk About When We Talk About Fifty Bucks

http://www.insidehighered.com/sites/default/server_files/styles/large/public/confessions_of_a_community_college_dean_blog_header.jpgBy Matt Reed. Students will pay extra for a sense of fairness. Until last year, we had a non-credit math review class that we offered students who didn’t like, or believe, their score on the math placement test. For fifty bucks, we offered them a couple of weeks of guided review and a chance to retake the test. From an institutional perspective, this was a screaming deal. Fifty bucks could get you out of one, and possibly two, semesters of remediation that you didn’t really need. The savings on tuition alone are substantial; when you add the savings of time, it’s a no-brainer. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:38 - - Permalien [#]


Loans Back in the Spotlight

HomeBy Libby A. Nelson. When President Obama made a speech from the Rose Garden on Friday about student loans, it seemed like history was repeating itself. The same thing happened at this time last year: with weeks to go before a scheduled increase in the student loan interest rate, the issue turns into a high-profile political fight. As Obama acknowledged: “If this sounds like déjà vu all over again, that’s because it is.”
Last year
, the interest rate on newly issued subsidized Stafford student loans -- loans that are available only to students with financial need, and that don’t accumulate interest while students are enrolled in college -- was scheduled to double to 6.8 percent on July 1. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:35 - - Permalien [#]

Does Science Need a Global Language?

HomeBy Serena Golden. Whether or not science needs a global language -- which, Scott L. Montgomery believes, it does -- like it or not, it already has one: English. So Montgomery argues in his new book, Does Science Need a Global Language? English and the Future of Research (University of Chicago Press). Montgomery, who is an affiliate faculty member in the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, lays out a host of data in support of his claim that English has more and more become the language of scientific communication and publication -- and that it is likely to remain so for quite some time to come. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:32 - - Permalien [#]

The New ‘New Normal’

HomeBy Kevin Kiley. Mandatory tuition and fees at the University of California system have about doubled since 2007, but this year, if the state’s governor has his way, they will stay flat. And the University of California is far from alone. Purdue University is freezing tuition for the first time since 1976. Iowa’s three universities will also probably hold tuition prices constant for the first time in more than 30 years. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:30 - - Permalien [#]

Entrepreneurial and Innovative

HomeBy Terri E. Givens. A University of Texas colleague, Rick Cherwitz, recently sent around his thoughts on how to respond to critics who think that our university should run more like a business. Rick is the director of the university’s program on intellectual entrepreneurship. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:24 - - Permalien [#]

Postdoc Pay: A Women's Issue

HomeBy Jennifer Bussell. The message is loud, clear, and has reached cultural saturation: women are underrepresented at the top of highly competitive professions because they cannot reconcile the amount of time needed for such careers with the time they want to spend raising children. Just acknowledging this point has been a recent watershed moment for feminism, triggered by Anne-Marie Slaughter’s controversial Atlantic article and the release of Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In. Slaughter and Sandberg offer different views on exactly what’s holding women back, but both agree that much of it has to do with raising children. And, of course, each woman and critic has proposed an array of internal and structural changes to help improve work-life balance for women in highly competitive fields. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:21 - - Permalien [#]