08 juin 2013

32 Partners from 28 Countries Launch LoCloud - Local Content in Europeana Cloud

http://www.elearningeuropa.info/sites/default/files/imagecache/content_detail_picture/news/20130606_LoCloud_Logo.jpgLoCloud explores the potential of cloud computing technologies for Europeana, with a focus on small and medium sized institutions.
On 19-20 March, at the National Archives of Norway in Oslo, the LoCloud Best Practice Network project was officially launched. The meeting gathered 32 partners from 28 different countries to present, plan and discuss the activities of the project over the next three years.
Content from small and medium local institutions such as museums, archives and libraries is still underrepresented in the digital European arena. Cloud-based technology could offer an affordable and user-friendly solution for making their content available on-line.
LoCloud aims to develop cloud-based technology and services to help small and medium local institutions to aggregate their digital resources and make them accessible on-line, via Europeana.eu, the European Library, Museum and Archive.
The project will explore the potential of a cloud-based technology infrastructure for aggregating local content. It will also develop a number of micro-services offering geo-location and metadata enrichment, multilingual vocabularies for local history and archaeology, a historical place name gazetteer and a Wikimedia application to handling relevant ‘crowd-sourced’ content.
As a result of the LoCloud’s activities, access to over 4 million items of digital content will be made available through Europeana. LoCloud Official Website.

Posté par pcassuto à 21:33 - - Permalien [#]


LWF13: The Future of Learning Conference and Festival

http://www.elearningeuropa.info/sites/default/files/elearning_papers.pngRelaunching its renowned Handheld Learning, Game Based Learning and Digital Safety conferences to be hosted 17th-18th June, followed by the LWF 13 Future of Learning Conference & Festival hosted 19th-21st June.
Since 2004 LWF has consistently presented some of the most challenging, forward-thinking conferences that lead, facilitate and record the dialogue about the transformation of society and how our education systems can respond. As a leader and progressive thinker in this field we very much welcome your participation.

Posté par pcassuto à 21:12 - - Permalien [#]
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Fachforum Didaktische Entwurfsmuster für Blended Learning

http://www.elearningeuropa.info/sites/default/files/imagecache/content_detail_picture/events/elearninghessen%C3%A7.jpgDie Kombination von Präsenzlehre und Online-Elementen ist in vielen Lehrveranstaltungen gewinnbringend. Für Lehrende, die bewährte Konzepte von Kollegen/-innen aufgreifen möchten, steht eine große Zahl von Best-Practice-Beispielen zur Verfügung. Doch gute Beispiele in der Lehre lassen sich nicht einfach kopieren, sondern es ist jeweils ein Transfer auf die eigenen Bedingungen vorzunehmen. Didaktische Entwurfsmuster sind ein Werkzeug, diesen Transfer zu unterstützen. In ihnen werden die zentralen Gestaltungselemente mehrfach bewährter Praxis verdichtet und als veranstaltungsunabhängiges Muster für den Transfer auf andere Lehrveranstaltungen verfügbar gemacht.
Im Fachforum tauschen sich Erfahrungsträger/-innen mit bewährten Beispielen und interessierte Lehrende auf experimentelle Weise aus. Sie sprechen über die Beispiele und identifizieren und beschreiben gemeinsam veranstaltungsübergreifende didaktische Gestaltungselemente - die didaktischen Entwurfsmuster. Der Clou in diesem Verständigungsprozess: Die Erfahrungsträger bringen ein, was ihnen wichtig erscheint, die interessierten Lehrenden, was sie für den Transfer brauchen. Website: http://www.e-learning-hessen.de/fachforen.html.

Posté par pcassuto à 21:09 - - Permalien [#]

A series of conferences on trends in the Information and Knowledge Society

http://www.elearningeuropa.info/sites/default/files/imagecache/content_detail_picture/events/sic.jpg[sic] is the name of a series of conferences on trends in the Information and Knowledge Society. Our conferences take place once per month and are designed to discuss current issues about the Information Society.  
[sic] is an initiative by the Open University of Catalonia (UOC), the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (JRC- IPTS) and the Junta de Andalucía (CEICE).
In this context, Debates [sic] aims at contributing to the discussion by offering a plural and enriching debate on selected topics. We will invite experts and professionals from fields as diverse as public participation, the health, education or technology, to discuss with you social relations and the challenges involved.
11th June
Sexualidad y TIC

Posté par pcassuto à 21:05 - - Permalien [#]

SMART 2013 - Social Media in Academia

http://www.elearningeuropa.info/sites/default/files/elearning_papers.pngSocial Media in Academia: Research and Teaching provides relevant theoretical frameworks and the latest research on social media the challenges in the educational context. Our conference is essential for professionals aiming to improve their understanding of social media at different levels of education as well as researchers in the fields of e-learning, educational science and information and communication sciences and much more. Special round-table: Personal Learning Environments.
Please visit sa conference website for more information: http://smart2013.edusoft.ro.
Venue: Vila Corola is located on the Apusului Street, No. 5, Bacau, Romania (near LIDL Supermarket) Phone: 0040758 731 151 & 0040334 111 665, Fax: 0040334 111 665 E-mail: geo_branzei@yahoo.com or contact@pensiuneacorola.ro GPS: Lat: 46.56925202519984, Long: 26.894997819311463
Website: http://www.pensiuneacorola.ro/?lang=en Apusului Street, No. 5, Bacau, Romania.

Posté par pcassuto à 20:59 - - Permalien [#]


Quality Assurance in Doctoral Education – results of the ARDE project

LogoBy Joanne Byrne, Thomas Jørgensen, Tia Loukkola. Quality Assurance in Doctoral Education - results of the ARDE project
Executive summary

The ARDE project aimed at demonstrating how quality assurance for doctoral education has been implemented in European universities. As the Bologna Process has developed, universities have put great effort into professionalising their quality assurance as well as their doctoral education, albeit often in separate processes. However, the two processes are beginning to merge. Doctoral education is being managed more professionally through doctoral schools and institutions are giving more attention to accountability and quality enhancement. This publication describes the developments, outlines recommendations and underlines the differences between quality assurance for doctoral education and quality assurance for the first and second cycle.
Chapter 1 gives an outline of the project, its background and methodology. The ARDE project takes its point of departure in the development of doctorate-specific quality assurance processes that have been developed over the last decade. Through a combination of quantitative methods (a European-wide survey) and qualitative methods (focus group meetings with university representatives and a workshop including non-university stakeholders) the ARDE project gathered a wide body of evidence regarding processes, challenges and good practices in quality assurance in doctoral education.
Chapter 2 describes how European quality assurance has developed around the concepts of accountability, quality enhancement and the aim of creating a quality culture engaging management, staff and students in universities. It also describes how universities have professionalised, in the same time period, the management of doctoral education through doctoral schools – institutional bodies that monitor and develop doctoral education.
Chapter 3 presents the survey results, which give more detail concerning the processes in place within institutions to ensure that the management of doctoral education is carried out in an accountable manner. The survey demonstrates that processes are largely in place, though reforms are very much ongoing. There is also a strong indication that doctoral education is evaluated by many different external stakeholders at the same time.
Chapter 4 gives a detailed view of how doctoral education is monitored through external and internal evaluations. The chapter introduces different models of external evaluations, including programme accreditation and institutional audits as well as examples of the use of national qualification frameworks and learning outcomes. Internal evaluations are described with examples of common practices such as the monitoring of doctoral candidates’ progress. The chapter also contains considerations about the specificity of doctoral education and the use of key performance indicators.
Chapter 5 is devoted to the central area of supervision with examples of measures to improve accountability as well as quality enhancement. It outlines a number of good practices in terms of establishing processes to enhance the quality of supervision through the engagement of staff. The chapter also presents different types of supervision rules and guidelines that specify rights, duties and responsibilities of both supervisors and supervisees.
Chapter 6 deals with the issue of career development services and particularly the challenges of creating good feedback mechanisms to develop and improve these services. The chapter contains examples of transferable skills training and the use of career tracking and services on the institutional and national levels. Although quality assurance for career development is less developed and presents considerable challenges, the chapter identifies a number of good practices in the field. The conclusions underline the common purposes for quality assurance in all three cycles as accountability and quality enhancement, but emphasise that the processes to achieve these purposes often contain different elements when it comes to doctoral education due to its nature as training through research. Download Quality Assurance in Doctoral Education - results of the ARDE project.

Posté par pcassuto à 20:41 - - Permalien [#]

EUA Global University Rankings and Their Impact - Report II

http://www.eua.be/images/logo.jpg4. Main conclusions - EUA Global University Rankings and Their Impact - Report II
1. There have been significant new developments since the publication of the first EUA Report in 2011, including the emergence of a new venture, the Universitas 21 Rankings of National Higher Education Systems, methodological changes made in a number of existing rankings and importantly a considerable diversification in the types of products offered by several rankings providers.
2. Global university rankings continue to focus principally on the research function of the university and are still not able to do justice to research carried out in the arts, humanities and the social sciences. Moreover, even bibliometric indicators still have strong biases and flaws. The limitations of rankings remain most apparent in efforts to measure teaching performance.
3. A welcome development is that the providers of the most popular global rankings have themselves started to draw attention to the biases and flaws in the data underpinning rankings and thus to the dangers of misusing rankings.
4. New multi-indicator tools for profiling, classifying or benchmarking higher education institutions offered by the rankings providers are proliferating. These increase the pressure on and the risk of overburdening universities, obliged to collect ever more data in order to maintain as high a profile as possible. The growing volume of information being gathered on universities, and the new “products” on offer also strengthen both the influence of the ranking providers and their potential impact.
5. Rankings are beginning to impact on public policy making as demonstrated by their influence in the development of immigration policies in some countries, in determining the choice of university partner institutions, or in which cases foreign qualifications are recognised. The attention paid to rankings is also reflected in discussions on university mergers in some countries.
6. A growing number of universities have started to use data compiled from rankings for the purpose of benchmarking exercises that in turn feed into institutional strategic planning.
7. Rankings are here to stay. Even if academics are aware that the results of rankings are biased and cannot satisfactorily measure institutional quality, on a more pragmatic level they also recognise that an impressive position in the rankings can be a key factor in securing additional resources, recruiting more students and attracting strong partner institutions. Therefore those universities not represented in global rankings are tempted to calculate their likely scores in order to assess their chances of entering the rankings; everyone should bear in mind that not all publication output consists of articles in journals, and many issues relevant to academic quality cannot be measured quantitatively at all...
PART II: Methodological changes and new developments in rankings since 2011

EUA’s 2011 Report analysed the major global rankings in existence at that time. The report covered the most popular university rankings, in particular: SRC ARWU and THE and QS rankings, rankings focused solely on research such as the Taiwanese HEEACT (since 2012 NTU Ranking) and the CWTS Leiden Ranking. Reference was also made to the outcomes of the EU Working Group on Assessment of University-Based Research (AUBR) which focused on the methodologies of research evaluation rather than on rankings and to the development of multi-indicator resources such as the EU-supported U-Map and U-Multirank, and the OECD AHELO feasibility study on student learning outcomes. This part of the present report covers both new developments in the global university rankings dealt with in the 2011 Report, and the methodologies of some rankings not covered in 2011 in further detail.
1. The SRC ARWU rankings

ARWU Ranking Lab and Global Research University Profiles (GRUP)
Macedonian University Rankings 29 Greater China Ranking
2. National Taiwan University Ranking: performance ranking of scientific papers for world universities
3. Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education World University Ranking
THE academic reputation surveys and THE World Reputation Ranking
THE 100 under 50 ranking
4. Thomson Reuters’ Global Institutional Profiles Project
5. Quacqarelli-Symmonds rankings
QS World University Ranking
Additional league table information
The QS classification
QS Stars
QS World University Rankings by subject
QS Best Student Cities Ranking 46 QS top-50-under-50 Ranking
6. CWTS Leiden Ranking
7. Webometrics Ranking of World Universities
8. U-Map
9. U-Multirank
10. U21 Rankings
of National Higher Education Systems
11. SCImago Rankings
SCImago Institutional Rankings
Other SCImago rankings and visualisations
12. University Ranking by Academic Performance
13. EUMIDA

14. AHELO
15. IREG
ranking audit. Download EUA Global University Rankings and Their Impact - Report II.

Posté par pcassuto à 20:27 - - Permalien [#]

European University Association annual report 2012

http://www.eua.be/images/logo.jpgEuropean University Association - EUA Annual Report 2012
Introduction - EUA: the largest and most comprehensive organisation representing European universities
With more than 850 members, including both universities and national rectors’ conferences, the European University Association (EUA) is the largest and most comprehensive organisation representing universities in Europe, with 17 million students enrolled at EUA’s member institutions. As the voice of European universities, EUA supports and takes forward the interests of universities and the sector as a whole. EUA provides unrivalled opportunities for members to share best practices by participating in projects, events and mutual learning activities involving a wide range of universities. Above all, EUA provides members with unique opportunities to influence and shape future European policies and initiatives affecting higher education and research. Through its work and contacts with the European Commission, Parliament and other key decision-makers, EUA ensures universities’ interests and concerns are taken up with all key stakeholders.
This year’s annual report outlines the different areas of EUA’s work over the course of the last twelve months: the first section looks at key developments in policy, project and other membership activities in 2012; section two provides an overview of EUA’s organisation, governance and membership development; the final section presents the financial statements of the association. The annexes compile details of all principal events, EUA position statements, projects and publications in 2012...
1. Learning and Teaching: Universities in the European Higher Education Area

EUA’s work on learning and teaching is undertaken in the context of developments at EU-level and within the broader framework of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). In 2012 the association’s priorities included providing input into the European Commission’s proposal for, and subsequent negotiations on, the content and budget of Erasmus for All, the next generation of EU programmes for education (2014-2020), and communicating the sector’s views in the context of the Bologna Process Ministerial discussions.
Based on the priorities highlighted by the university sector in EUA’s extensive membership consultation on the Erasmus for All proposal, such as the central role of recognition, funding and partnerships in enhancing mobility, a bilateral exchange took place between the European Commissioner for Education, Androulla Vassiliou, and the EUA Council in January. The association continued to feed the university perspective into related discussions with the Commission and Parliament throughout the year and in November issued a statement addressed to European heads of state and government ahead of the EU Budget Summit in November, outlining the reasons for prioritising investment in the education and research elements of the EU Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), which sets out the EU budget for 2014-2020.
In April, an EUA delegation led by its President contributed to the discussion at the Bologna Process Ministerial Conference in Bucharest on the future priorities for the development of the European Higher Education Area in the context of the ongoing financial and economic crisis. EUA underlined the key issues at stake for its members, such as investing in higher education, strengthening mobility and enhancing quality, which were spelled out in detail in its Bologna input statement and taken up in the Bucharest Communiqué agreed by ministers. Much of EUA’s policy and project work over the year took up the topics highlighted in the Bucharest Communiqué. The results of the two-year TRACKIT research project, which examined the practice of tracking university students’ and graduates’ progression paths in 31 European countries, were thus published and widely disseminated. The report presented information on methods for tracking students’ and graduates’ progress at institutional and national level, and pointed to the positive impact of tracking in terms of raising awareness of teaching results and understanding student dropout rates. EUA also continued to monitor new developments in teaching and learning, for example by following closely the emergence and potential impact of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) on the European higher education landscape.
EUA also presented the outcomes of the MAUNIMO project, which explored how European universities are expanding and improving their mobility activities and strategies, thus picking up another key priority for both policy makers and universities. The project centred on better understanding mobility in an institutional context. The project report, which concluded with a series of reflections on linking mobility policies and practices, was disseminated widely to European higher education institutions, policy makers and other stakeholders in September. In the context of the EU-facilitated Pristina-Belgrade dialogue, EUA also assists in the process of certifying diplomas issued by universities in Kosovo or Serbia, as a means of facilitating the mobility of graduates in the region. Download EUA Annual Report 2012.

Posté par pcassuto à 19:09 - Permalien [#]

European University Association annual report 2012

http://www.eua.be/images/logo.jpgEuropean University Association - EUA Annual Report 2012
Introduction - EUA: the largest and most comprehensive organisation representing European universities
With more than 850 members, including both universities and national rectors’ conferences, the European University Association (EUA) is the largest and most comprehensive organisation representing universities in Europe, with 17 million students enrolled at EUA’s member institutions. As the voice of European universities, EUA supports and takes forward the interests of universities and the sector as a whole. EUA provides unrivalled opportunities for members to share best practices by participating in projects, events and mutual learning activities involving a wide range of universities. Above all, EUA provides members with unique opportunities to influence and shape future European policies and initiatives affecting higher education and research. Through its work and contacts with the European Commission, Parliament and other key decision-makers, EUA ensures universities’ interests and concerns are taken up with all key stakeholders.
This year’s annual report outlines the different areas of EUA’s work over the course of the last twelve months: the first section looks at key developments in policy, project and other membership activities in 2012; section two provides an overview of EUA’s organisation, governance and membership development; the final section presents the financial statements of the association. The annexes compile details of all principal events, EUA position statements, projects and publications in 2012...
1. Learning and Teaching: Universities in the European Higher Education Area

EUA’s work on learning and teaching is undertaken in the context of developments at EU-level and within the broader framework of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). In 2012 the association’s priorities included providing input into the European Commission’s proposal for, and subsequent negotiations on, the content and budget of Erasmus for All, the next generation of EU programmes for education (2014-2020), and communicating the sector’s views in the context of the Bologna Process Ministerial discussions.
Based on the priorities highlighted by the university sector in EUA’s extensive membership consultation on the Erasmus for All proposal, such as the central role of recognition, funding and partnerships in enhancing mobility, a bilateral exchange took place between the European Commissioner for Education, Androulla Vassiliou, and the EUA Council in January. The association continued to feed the university perspective into related discussions with the Commission and Parliament throughout the year and in November issued a statement addressed to European heads of state and government ahead of the EU Budget Summit in November, outlining the reasons for prioritising investment in the education and research elements of the EU Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), which sets out the EU budget for 2014-2020.
In April, an EUA delegation led by its President contributed to the discussion at the Bologna Process Ministerial Conference in Bucharest on the future priorities for the development of the European Higher Education Area in the context of the ongoing financial and economic crisis. EUA underlined the key issues at stake for its members, such as investing in higher education, strengthening mobility and enhancing quality, which were spelled out in detail in its Bologna input statement and taken up in the Bucharest Communiqué agreed by ministers. Much of EUA’s policy and project work over the year took up the topics highlighted in the Bucharest Communiqué. The results of the two-year TRACKIT research project, which examined the practice of tracking university students’ and graduates’ progression paths in 31 European countries, were thus published and widely disseminated. The report presented information on methods for tracking students’ and graduates’ progress at institutional and national level, and pointed to the positive impact of tracking in terms of raising awareness of teaching results and understanding student dropout rates. EUA also continued to monitor new developments in teaching and learning, for example by following closely the emergence and potential impact of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) on the European higher education landscape.
EUA also presented the outcomes of the MAUNIMO project, which explored how European universities are expanding and improving their mobility activities and strategies, thus picking up another key priority for both policy makers and universities. The project centred on better understanding mobility in an institutional context. The project report, which concluded with a series of reflections on linking mobility policies and practices, was disseminated widely to European higher education institutions, policy makers and other stakeholders in September. In the context of the EU-facilitated Pristina-Belgrade dialogue, EUA also assists in the process of certifying diplomas issued by universities in Kosovo or Serbia, as a means of facilitating the mobility of graduates in the region. Download EUA Annual Report 2012.

Posté par pcassuto à 19:09 - Permalien [#]

Coopération franco-japonaise pour l'enseignement supérieur et la recherche - doubler le nombre d'étudiants japonais d'ici à 2020

http://cache.media.enseignementsup-recherche.gouv.fr/image/Ministre/28/9/Deplacement_au_Japon_255289.79.jpgLors de la visite d'Etat du Président de la République au Japon du 6 au 8 juin, deux accords ont été signés, l'un dans le domaine de la science des matériaux, le second concernant  la coopération entre le synchrotron SOLEIL, le Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute et l'Institut RIKEN Harima.
Dans le cadre de la visite d'Etat du Président de la République au Japon, Geneviève Fioraso a clôturé le 8e Comité conjoint Japon France, pour la coopération scientifique et technologique, en présence de son homologue japonais, en charge de la recherche et de l'espace, Ichita Yamamoto. La politique française, concernant le Japon, poursuit un double objectif: accroître entre les deux pays la mobilité des étudiants, et celle des chercheurs notamment en sciences, et renforcer la coopération scientifique, déjà très dense entre les deux pays, en en focalisant sur les grandes priorités de leurs agendas stratégiques de recherche respectifs...
Au lendemain de l'adoption en première lecture du projet de loi relatif à l'enseignement supérieur et à la recherche à l'Assemblée nationale et de la présentation de l'Agenda stratégique de la Recherche "France Europe 2020", la ministre a rappelé que cette ambition nouvelle pour la France passe par un renforcement de l'ouverture internationale:
 * en terme de mobilité étudiante
La France accueille chaque année 2 000 étudiants japonais, (sur 140 000 inscrits à l'étranger), presque exclusivement dans les filières artistiques, et compte moins de 1 000 étudiants français au Japon. La loi d'orientation pour l'enseignement supérieur et la recherche vise justement à renforcer l'attractivité de notre pays pour les étudiants, en les accueillant mieux, avec des visas pluriannuels, des formations en anglais et français pour attirer des étudiants dans les filières scientifiques, commerciales et technologiques. L'objectif est de doubler le nombre d'étudiants japonais d'ici à 2020, notamment dans les filières scientifiques. Suite de l'article...
Le linn na cuairte staid Uachtarán Phoblacht sa tSeapáin 6-8 Meitheamh, síníodh dhá chomhaontú, ceann amháin i réimse na heolaíochta ábhair, an dara maidir le comhar idir an synchrotron Soleil, an tSeapáin Synchrotron Institiúid um Thaighde Radaíochta agus an Institiúid Harima RIKEN. Níos mó...

 

Posté par pcassuto à 18:23 - - Permalien [#]