13 avril 2013

Washington Eyes Raising State Tuition of Foreigners

New York TimesBy Tamar Lewin. Some Washington State legislators are proposing a 20 percent tuition surcharge for international students at the state’s public universities and community colleges as a way to raise revenues.
With the surcharge, international undergraduates would pay an extra $6,000 at the University of Washington, where the nonresident tuition is nearly $30,000 a year. The university has about 3,000 international undergraduates and 1,300 international graduate students among its 43,000 students. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:48 - - Permalien [#]


For Contractor in Special Ed, Huge Fees and Poor Care

New York TimesBy David M. Halbfinger. Cheon H. Park ran a company that had begun to prosper on government contracts, but he had bigger ambitions. So he tore down his shabby headquarters on a quiet street in Flushing, Queens, and replaced it with a lavish three-story building that had marble floors, granite countertops, red carpets and a soaring chandelier. Then he brought in the clients: 3- and 4-year-olds with developmental disabilities. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:40 - - Permalien [#]

State Lines May Ease for Classes Held Online

New York TimesBy Tamar Lewin. Higher education leaders have proposed a way to make it easier for universities to offer online courses across state lines. The proposal would replace a cumbersome patchwork of rules and fees that make it costly for universities to offer online courses to students in different states. With some seven million students enrolled in online college courses for credit — a number that is growing rapidly — higher education officials say it is crucial to simplify the system. A commission on online learning led by former Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley outlined a proposal on Thursday under which any institution that had received state authorization for its online programs, based on certain quality and consumer protection standards, would be allowed to enroll students from other states that met the same basic standards and agreed to reciprocity. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:38 - - Permalien [#]

Texting 'lowers students' grades'

http://bathknightblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/telegraph-logo.jpgBy Nick Collins. Students who spend long periods each day texting fall behind in their studies but reading newspapers could boost their performance, according to a new study. Women in their first year of university spent almost 12 hours a day on media-related activities such as texting, social networking, browsing the internet and watching television. In most cases these activities were linked to lower effort and grades, but reading newspapers and listening to music appeared to improve students' academic performance. Rather than trying to change students' behaviour, professors should attempt to integrate unhelpful social media into academic study, for example by using it to refer students to learning material, experts said. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:33 - - Permalien [#]

Margaret Thatcher showed us why tuition fees won't work

http://bathknightblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/telegraph-logo.jpgRadical reforms were needed to turn complacent industries into competitive ones under Thatcher. Higher education needs the same reforming zeal, says Gervas Huxley. In the last few days several commentators have reminded us that the Thatcher government was not only ideologically committed to free markets but also pragmatic in its approach. Mrs Thatcher understood perfectly well that the ‘free markets’ do not arise spontaneously – they have to be created...
To date, this lesson has been ignored. This is because of a fundamental misconception about higher education which makes it appear different: in 1979 it was impossible for most people to conceive of competition between providers of electricity or gas; in my experience, is it hard for outsiders to understand the extent to which universities do not compete. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:30 - - Permalien [#]


Stop saying degrees are a waste of £50,000 - they're not

http://bathknightblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/telegraph-logo.jpgBy David Ellis. Dismissing a university education as an indulgent way to eat up £50,000 is fashionable but asinine, says David Ellis. During graduation, perhaps even in the ceremony itself, there is an almost perceptible ‘pop’ of the university bubble bursting. Suddenly the only thing that matters is landing a job. Dozens of applications are duly sent out en masse, which tends to be followed by weeks of rejection letters or impolite, frustrating silence. And students are surprised by this – as if a generic letter and a 2:1 entitles the bearer to a job. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:27 - - Permalien [#]

Decision-making in universities should be predictable and clear

Times Higher EducationEfficient and inclusive decision-making will help universities to gain the support of their communities, says Ferdinand von Prondzynski. A few years ago I was asked to advise a university on its decision-making processes. This is always an interesting challenge because universities are extraordinarily complex bodies. Initially, I asked 10 people to explain to me where and how decisions were taken in the institution. No two of them gave the same answer. The one common thread, however, was that wherever it was that matters were decided, they weren’t there. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:24 - - Permalien [#]

News Mooc? What’s a Mooc?

Times Higher EducationBy David Matthews. Survey reveals online revolution is news to large proportion of European universities. More than four in ten European universities have not heard of massive open online courses (Moocs), according to a new report. A total of 175 institutions took part in a survey conducted to coincide with the European University Association’s annual conference in Ghent on 11-12 April. The responses reveal that 58 per cent knew what a Mooc was, although 88 per cent wanted to learn more. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:22 - - Permalien [#]

US academics’ salaries ‘slowly recovering’

Times Higher EducationBy Chris Parr. Salaries for full-time faculty members at US colleges and universities are slowly recovering after years of below-inflation rises, although higher education institutions are increasingly reliant on part-time staff, a report has revealed. Figures for 2012-13 show that the overall full-time salary increase of 1.7 per cent is on a par with increases in prices for the first time in four years. However, according to the American Association of University Professors, which published the data, this is primarily because the US rate of inflation is currently so low. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:20 - - Permalien [#]

From the archive, 12 April 1966: Battle lines drawn over student loans

The Guardian homeUniversity students will resist government attempts to replace grants with loans. A lot of artificial fury will be generated at the conference of the National Union of Students in Exeter this week. Delegates will go through the ritual of threatening a strike if the Government declares any intention of replacing maintenance grants by repayable loans. The Government has never stated any such intention. All the same, it is an argument that keeps cropping up. Sides have already been taken. On one are the NUS, the National Union of Teachers, the Association of Teachers in Technical Institutions, and the Trades Union Congress. On the other, only Sir William Mansfield Cooper (Vice-Chancellor of Manchester University), Lord Bowden (Principal of Manchester College of Science and Technology), and Dr Mark Blaug (reader in the economics of education at the London School of Economics) have so far openly stated support for a look at loans.
At a time when state expenditure on higher education is being closely questioned, it does no harm to raise the issue again. The most persuasive argument yet raised in favour of loans comes from Dr Blaug, in an almost unnoticed paper published last year by the Manchester School of Economics. Dr Blaug's research shows that graduates reap a private rate of return on the nation's investment in them of 14 per cent a year throughout their lives. If this investment is estimated at £4,000, then their rate of return on it at the age of 40 to 50 becomes about £400 a year in salary over the student who finished his formal education at 18. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:11 - - Permalien [#]