23 février 2013

Beyond the Buzz, Where Are MOOCs Really Going?

By Michael Horn and Clayton Christensen. Everyone’s going MOOC-crazy these days. From frequent media coverage of online courses and platforms like Coursera, edX, Udacity, and Udemy to discussions about the complexities and business models of online education, the excitement around MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) has finally “bubbled” over. The question is not just whether MOOCs are going to disrupt traditional education, but how. Is it just about lower costs and access? Is it really going to be a Napster-like moment with entrenched “Teamsters in tweed” worried about the erosion of their research, publishing, and teaching?
This is where we can leave the realm of hype and commentary to draw on our own years of research into disruption theory. Because the curious thing about the MOOC wave of disruption is that the market leaders — not just upstarts from the edges — are the ones pioneering it. And that rarely happens. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:00 - - Permalien [#]


Beyond the Buzz, Where Are MOOCs Really Going?

By Michael Horn and Clayton Christensen. Everyone’s going MOOC-crazy these days. From frequent media coverage of online courses and platforms like Coursera, edX, Udacity, and Udemy to discussions about the complexities and business models of online education, the excitement around MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) has finally “bubbled” over. The question is not just whether MOOCs are going to disrupt traditional education, but how. Is it just about lower costs and access? Is it really going to be a Napster-like moment with entrenched “Teamsters in tweed” worried about the erosion of their research, publishing, and teaching?
This is where we can leave the realm of hype and commentary to draw on our own years of research into disruption theory. Because the curious thing about the MOOC wave of disruption is that the market leaders — not just upstarts from the edges — are the ones pioneering it. And that rarely happens. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:00 - - Permalien [#]

The Most Thorough Description (to date) of University Experience with MOOC

By Phil Hill. One of the benefits of participating in an interactive event, such as the recent ELI Webinar that Michael and I led yesterday, is that the learning goes both ways. During the webinar, one of the participants shared a link for a report from Duke University on their first MOOC, Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach, delivered through Coursera in fall 2012. And what a find that was – this is the most thorough description I have yet seen from a university about their experience selecting, development, delivering and analyzing a MOOC. Kudos to Yvonne Belanger and Jessica Thornton, the authors.
What follows are some key excerpts along with some observations, but for anyone considering participation in one of the xMOOCs – read the whole report. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:58 - - Permalien [#]

Coursera Adds 29 Schools, 90 Courses And 3 New Languages To Its Online Learning Platform

Screen shot 2013-02-20 at 3.01.00 PMIt’s almost as if there’s an arms race in online education. Which MOOC platform can expand the fastest? Place your bets now. On the heels of edX’s announcement that it will be expanding internationally with the addition of six new schools (bringing its total to 12), Coursera is doing some addition of its own.
Today, the massive online course platform announced that 29 universities from around the globe have agreed to bring their courses online (for free) via Coursera. The new members will join the 33 institutions already on board, bringing Coursera’s grand total to 62. And, of course, just as edX was kicking back to celebrate its five new handpicked international members, Coursera announces that its updated roster just so happens to include 16 international institutions itself.
The international expansion of both Coursera and edX is a big win for international students, who (at least in Coursera’s case) now have access to courses in multiple languages, including French, Spanish, Chinese and Italian. Of course, international expansion is also an important part of the roadmap for edX and Coursera (and online learning sites like Lynda.com as well) and could be a boon for both, exposing a whole new audience of potential MOOC adopters to courses from some of the most reputed schools in the world. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:56 - - Permalien [#]

Course design and materials development guide

http://www.saide.org.za/design-guide/sites/all/themes/designguide/images/largehead.jpgThere are a number of general factors that impact on educators and their teaching. These include changes in funding formulas, scarcity of resources, increasing convergence between traditional distance education and traditional campus education, and the influence of technologies.
Course and materials design and development is a multi-layered, multi-faceted process. All of these factors play a part in the choices that are made for the planning and delivery of education. This Guide will help you to think about five questions in relation to a number of key issues – such as planning, content, context, learner support, structure, resources, learning, and assessment – in relation to course and materials design. The answers to the questions at the level of course design influence your answers in relation to materials design, and create a golden thread or a story-line between course and materials design and development. Whether you are designing learning materials for delivery in campus-based courses or fully online off-campus courses, or something in between, the broad design issues are similar.

Posté par pcassuto à 08:51 - - Permalien [#]

Common Misperceptions of MOOCs and Open Learning

http://aaeebl.org/Resources/Pictures/aaeebl%20banner%20919.jpgBy Trent Batson. We read in a New York Times lead editorial --http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/opinion/the-trouble-with-online-college.html?hp&_r=0 -- that online learning does not work very well.  Or we read or hear, from numerous sources, that MOOCs (as one form of online learning) are either the wave of the future or, maybe, the end of college as we know it.  Confusion reigns.  How should we think about the accelerated growth in online learning opportunities and MOOCs -- Massive Open Online Courses?
A widely-held but false assumption about education can perhaps help explain the confusion: many people seem to believe that, because we have had essentially one dominant model for formal learning (with slight variations) for centuries, we will similarly continue with a new, single, dominant model of learning once the dust settles.  MOOCs come along, draw massive numbers, receive significant venture capital, are associated with a number of elite universities, and commentators make it seem this is the next silver bullet, the next singular model of learning.  Part of the near hysteria about MOOCs may be grounded in either/or thinking:  we either have the traditional classroom model of today or we all do MOOCs.  We may be laboring under the false assumption that learning can happen only one way; no matter what direction we go in with formal learning, we will have just one dominant model. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:48 - - Permalien [#]

Report Says Stanford Is First University to Raise $1 Billion in a Single Year

New York TimesBy Tamar Lewin. Stanford last year became the first university to raise more than $1 billion in a single year, according to the Council for Aid to Education’s annual college fund-raising survey.
Partly because of large donations from entrepreneurial alumni who have made their fortunes in Silicon Valley, Stanford has been the top fund-raiser for eight straight years.
Last year, the university, near Palo Alto, said its five-year capital campaign, which ended in December 2011, had taken in a record-setting $6.23 billion, far exceeding its original goal of $4.3 billion, and surpassing by more than $2 billion any other single higher-education campaign. Read more...

Posté par pcassuto à 00:00 - Permalien [#]