29 janvier 2011

Contribution to the implementation of full costing in France

http://www.cpu.fr/fileadmin/img/logo_cpu.jpgThe third country workshop of the EUIMA – Full Costing project took place in Paris. The event was organised jointly with AMUE (Agence de Mutualisation des Universités et Etablissements) and CPU (Conférence des Présidents d’Université), which were selected to host the event due to their important role and continuous engagement in promoting the development of full costing in French universities. More information about the country workshop in France is available on the event website. More information about the future activities of the EUIMA – Full Costing project is available on the project web page.
The workshop clearly demonstrated that full costing is a priority issue for French universities, which need to develop the right financial tools to facilitate their strategic management and support their increasing autonomy. Such efforts are strongly backed by the AMUE and CPU, and in particular by the new president of CPU, Mr. Louis Vogel, who spoke at the meeting.
The workshop, which presented international good practice, brought together more than 100 participants from 66 French institutions, including universities, funding bodies and relevant ministries. This allowed for a dynamic and critical discussion about the framework conditions needed to implement successfully full costing in France. Following the key findings from EUA’s work on this topic, and the recommendations from the participating international experts, the commitment of the university leadership was identified as the crucial factor in achieving this aim.
An important outcome of the workshop was the announcement of a series of further steps which will be taken in the next year to move towards the implementation of full costing in French universities. With full support of the CPU, the AMUE, as a body created specifically to support universities’ management, will organise follow-up events to highlight best practice in France as well as topic-specific workshops and training to support French universities in the implementation of full costing.

Posté par pcassuto à 17:47 - - Permalien [#]


EUCEN 41st conference Education as a right - LLL for all!

http://www.eucen.eu/sites/default/files/u23/GranadaBanner.pngUniversity of Granada, Spain, 25-27 May 2011. It's time to sharpen your pencils and prepare your proposals because the EUCEN 41st conference Call for Contributions is OPEN!
You have four different topics to choose from as the theme for your contribution, namely:
1- European targets for widening participation for minorities.
2- The role of European Universities in the developing World.
3- Supporting university staff in conflict zones.
4- Volunteering as a path to education.

All the details and instructions, as well as the submission form and deadlines, are in our Call for Contributions section. If you want to submit a contribution and have a chance to present your work/research, please, download the full Call and fill in the form within.
http://www.eucen.eu/themes/eucen/images/small_european_logo.png1- European targets for widening participation for minorities
, Eric Agbessi Chair, Director UFR LACC - University Blaise Pascal, FR, Charo Romano Rapporteur, RUEPEP Steering comittee member, University Rovira i Virgilli, ES.
In the workshops of Topic 1, we will tackle a certain number of issues dealing with the following areas:
1. The meaning of supporting and promoting positive intercultural relations between minority and majority communities.
2. The limits of a European intercultural project based upon the contribution and participation of all communities.
3. The promotion of tangible projects on community development.
4. The motivations of European corporations to support a new diversity management: are companies prepared to take the necessary steps that would lead to a genuine overhaul of their corporate culture and improve race and gender relations at work?
While answering the questions listed above we will try to analyze the role of European universities in the promotion, development and implementation of policies on diversity.

Visit the University of Granada site (opens in a new window)

2- The role of European Universities in the developing World, Soledad Vieitez Chair, University of Granada, ES, Oliver Janoschka Rapporteur, EUCEN's Projects Director.
European Universities and those in developing countries have established academic partnerships for decades now. However, we need to address more carefully the role of European Universities to improve higher education and University lifelong learning (ULLL) in the developing world in order to understand the advancement of human rights, such as the right to education and its role in the strengthening fundamental freedoms. In doing so we must also document and explain the context in which European University cooperation with developing countries has been built. Europe has established relationships with the developing world mainly through development and international cooperation with a minimum impact on higher education so far. Thus colonial ties between some European countries and the developing World have been notorious, being European languages (French, English, Portuguese; even, Spanish) official in most developing countries of Africa, Latin America or Asia.
The current context of higher education in Europe allows for renewed and improved partnerships between universities to work towards education and, generally, human rights by European Universities in the developing world. In this session we shall address this current situation on both sides by offering global perspectives, providing specific and detailed cases, sharing best practices, reflecting upon distinctive institutional experiences, or making recommendations on policy for organizations at the national and/or the international level. Contributions to Workshop or Poster sessions may offer the following (or combinations of them): case studies, research results (whether final or work-in-progress), surveys or comparative analyses, and/or critical reviews reflecting upon the already mentioned issues.
Suggested focuses of abstracts and/or paper are the following:
* What has characterised the partnerships between European Universities and developing higher education institutions historically? Discussion of specific cases is encouraged.
* How have European Universities contributed to improve higher education and University lifelong learning (ULLL) in different settings of the developing world? Discussion of distinct experiences and/or regional comparison is most desirable.
* Which obstacles, barriers and/or challenges are to be considered regarding the advancement of human rights and the right to education in particular countries, and the specific role of European Universities in those?
* Which good practices, lessons to learn and/or success stories are we to find in this regard? What models, if so, are to rescue behind those experiences?
* Who are the beneficiaries of these programs and how can cooperation be extended further? Are University curricula, as well as skills and knowledge provided, sufficiently adapted to developing countries realities and to the demands of their specific labour markets?
* To what extent can we think of renewed and improved partnerships between universities on both sides? In which terms? Again, discussion of particular cases is encouraged.

Escuela de Posgrado's web site (opens in a new window)

3- Supporting university staff in conflict zones, Erwin Wagner Chair, Director of the Centre for Learning Enhancement, Hildesheim University, DE, Javier Villoria Rapporteur, International Relationships vice-dean, Educational Sciences Faculty, University of Granada, ES.
There can be found a lot of mutual relationships, forms of collaboration and joint efforts between university staff from European Universities and those in developing countries or otherwise outside Europe. Sometimes these may be established academic partnerships some may just be temporary links in projects or other programs. As in many regions universities, academic work and university staff are suffering from crises and conflicts, however, we need to address more carefully specific needs, conditions, sources, patterns and frameworks to support colleagues, consortia and networks under such circumstances. This is not only meant to help colleagues and partners; it is about caring for basic conditions of international collaboration and networking in ULLL throughout the world we are living and working.
Still the issue may not be sufficiently or well treated through declarations or additional money (if feasible at the end). Very often mere communication has to be kept alive, meeting should be possible over time or access to necessary information and technology may be in danger. The agenda thus may not only include scientific or research topics but also moving targets, infrastructure, adjustments, reorientation, breaking links, safety and diplomacy. How to survive and how to be successful in times of crisis and conflict may become a core topic of University lifelong learning.
Suggested focus of abstracts and/or papers in slots 1 and 2 may address the following issues:
Slot C in this strand will be used for a workshop to reflect the previous presentations and discussions and aiming at the conceptualisation of strategic and practical proposals to improve and to increase supporting university staff in conflict zones and times – going beyond Europe in different approaches.
* Which kind of experience do we have in supporting university staff in conflict zones/times?
* Which frameworks and relationships can support/sustain collaboration?
* What does university staff/what do colleagues in ULLL really need in conflict zones/times?
* To what extent can what kind of policy and diplomacy, which kind of networking and collaboration links offer support needed in conflict and/or crisis?
* Which professional, social and /or cultural approaches seem to be appropriate in supporting university staff in ULLL in conflict zones?
* Do we find good practice and success stories in this area?
* Are there interesting new approaches or projects to be presented and learnt from?
* Are there any certain lessons to learn?
http://eucen2011.escuelaposgrado.es/sites/default/files/eucen_small_logo.png4- Volunteering as a path to education, Alison Hughes, Chair, Continuing Education and Professional Development Officer, University of Liverpool, UK, Inmaculada Sanz Sainz Rapporteur, Modern Language Centre Director, University of Granada, ES.
Universities can often be perceived as exclusive institutions that do not always fully engage their communities. Some people may find that they do not suit academic learning, can feel that universities are inaccessible or may have been socially excluded from formal education in the past. ULLL, however, can provide opportunities for such people and can appeal to a more diverse group of people. It can provide a ‘second chance’ education and can help make education more socially inclusive. Universities in Europe are actively pursuing this agenda - as demonstrated in the Universities’ Charter on Lifelong Learning. Universities are aware that they need to embrace a wider and more diversified student base.
Volunteering has a central part to play in this. ULLL is increasingly linking with volunteers and organisations that involve volunteers. This can be through teaching partnerships, lectures, accreditation and training for volunteers. In turn, the volunteers gain new skills and qualifications, increase their confidence and self-esteem, and make new contacts.
Further benefits of linking ULLL and volunteering include: helping people learn about citizenship; improving someone’s employability in the job market; developing intercultural dialogue and fostering links between different communities; and providing opportunities for older people to be actively involved in education rather than risk being excluded from society.
Suggested focus of abstracts and/or papers in slots 1 and 2 may address the following issues:
Slot C in this strand will be a focused discussion/workshop reflecting on the themes brought out in the earlier 2 slots and also referencing the work of the VALUE project.
* To what extent can linking University Lifelong Learning and volunteering help counter the idea that universities are exclusive institutions?
* Who benefits and how from linking University Lifelong Learning and volunteering?
* What barriers to greater cooperation between University Lifelong Learning and volunteering need to be addressed?
* How can universities best respond to the rich learning that arises from the volunteering experience?
* Is there a sufficient match between skills and knowledge being developed by volunteers and University curricula?
* What type of awards or courses are most appropriate for volunteers?
* What sort of models might be appropriate for University-Volunteering interaction - centralised/devolved?

Posté par pcassuto à 10:23 - - Permalien [#]
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L'éducation dans le Rapport du Conseil d’analyse économique et du Conseil allemand des experts en économie

http://www.cae.gouv.fr/IMG/bandeau/bandeau.jpgLe Rapport "Evaluer la performance économique, le bien-être et la soutenabilité" du Conseil d’analyse économique et du Conseil allemand des experts en économie.
Ce rapport est un travail commun du Conseil d’analyse économique et du Conseil allemand des experts en économie. Il répond à une commande de la Chancelière fédérale d’Allemagne et du Président de la République française lors du Conseil des ministres franco-allemand du 4 février 2010... La principale contribution de ce travail est donc de proposer un tableau de bord de vingt-cinq indicateurs couvrant les trois domaines de la performance économique, de la qualité de la vie et de la soutenabilité (économique, financière et environnementale) du bien-être. L’examen de la situation française et allemande au regard de ces indicateurs permet d’illustrer l’intérêt, mais aussi la difficulté de l’emploi de tels indicateurs, notamment pour des comparaisons.
Parmi les indicateurs "Qualité de la vie" se trouve l'Education: Étudiants âgés de 15 à 24 ans en pourcentage de la population du même groupe d’âge. En voici le contenu:
Education

135. Apart from its immediate contribution to a high quality of life, education exerts indirect effects, since it enables people to intensify the positive experiences of other dimensions. For example, a higher level of education broadens the scope of personal activities that a person can potentially carry out, is usually associated with higher levels of health and reduces economic insecurities by increasing job stability. Therefore, it is important to capture the skills and knowledge of a society’s members with appropriate individual indicators. As (Giovannini et al., 2009) forcefully point out, the focus should thereby be on output measures instead of input measures like education expenditures. Among output indicators, years of schooling or the percentage of people participating in education and training are problematic candidates, as the quality of the respective forms of education is not known and hence international comparability is not ensured.
136. The best output indicators that capture skills and knowledge are probably obtained through testing of achievements in literacy and numeracy. While these output measures do exist in quite some detail for younger age groups, coverage of the whole population is more limited. But since we are interested in an indicator for education as a source of current quality of life, the education level of all age groups is relevant. Among the available (composite) indicators that capture a broader sample of the population, those based on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and its successors appear to be the most promising starting point.
At the heart of this endeavour lies the understanding that literacy is not a zero-one distinction between those who can read and write and those who cannot, but rather a continuous, multifaceted phenomenon. Specifically, literacy is defined as the ability to use “printed and written information to function in society, to achieve one’s goals, and to develop one’s knowledge and potential” (Kirsch, 2001). The IALS asks a representative sample of people between the age of 16 and 65 to read, understand and interpret various texts, covering prose literacy (continuous texts like medicine labels, descriptions, manuals), document literacy (noncontinuous texts as in figures or tables), and quantitative literacy (calculations based on information from continuous or non-continuous texts). The results are ranked on a scale from zero to 500, and five proficiency levels are derived. IALS was conducted in 20 countries in the years 1994, 1996, and 1998.
The IALS was replaced by the Adult Literacy and Life Skills (ALL) survey conducted in 2003 and 2006 in a subset of these countries. ALL differs from IALS in its third field. Instead of quantitative literacy, ALL features a numeracy scale that covers proficiency in estimation and statistics.
Furthermore, it includes a fourth field problem solving. The OECD picks up these developments in its Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) survey. It is projected that the first results of this survey will not be available before the end of 2013 and will include the domains literacy, numeracy, problem solving, and information and communication technologies.
137. Studies based on panel data using skill assessments similar to IALS and its follow-ups document the fact that a lack of skills in the respective domains indeed exerts an adverse effect on many features that are associated with a high quality of life (for example, Bynner and Parsons, 1997). In particular, the positive correlation between low levels of literacy and numeracy and the risk of being unemployed, separated or divorced, physically ill, and less engaged in public activities appears to be robust and rather high. Subject to the condition that the OECD uses an appropriate data collection methodology to ensure reliable information, we propose to present the average scores of the PIAAC survey as the composite indicator of the education dimension. Moreover, it would be desirable to increase the survey’s continuity by carrying it out at least every two years and basing it on a survey design that ensures comparability over time. Reference to associated costs was already made in the first chapter.
138. Until such time as a sufficiently long time series exists, we have to rely on an interim indicator that best serves our purpose. Given our focus on regular reporting and coverage of a broader group of the populace, we propose to use students aged between 15 and 24 years as a percentage of the population of the same age group as an interim indicator. Indicator values are steadily improving in Germany, while values for France show a slight decrease over time.
139. In addition to discussing our preferred composite indicator, we conduct PCA for the education dimension. Ideally we should use output data that directly measure the increase in skills obtained in the educational system. Yet these data are difficult to collect because the skills of an individual are not directly observable and the available achievement surveys have not been evaluated frequently enough to allow a PCA. Therefore, we have to rely on other data sets. Specifically, we use Eurostat data for the period 1999-2007 for Germany and 1998-2007 for France. The data cover variables of participation rates, graduation rates and the share of early school leavers (share of individuals aged 18-24 years who have a lower secondary education or less). We use two participation variables: students aged between 15 and 24 years and students aged over 30 years, as a percentage of the respective population of the same age group. And we employ two graduation rate variables: the number of graduates who finished the first or second stage of tertiary education (ISCED 5-6) aged between 20 and 29 years per 1,000 people of the population, and the percentage of the population aged between 25 and 64 years who hold at least a higher secondary school qualification.
Variables capturing the quality of the educational system (output variables) should be used as soon as a reliable data collection procedure is discovered and its data quality is ascertained to be high. In future, output variables from the PIAAC study could be added as further variables to a PCA analysis. The first wave of PIAAC will be available at the end of 2013, but it will take a long time until these variables could be used for PCA because a relatively long time series is needed.
For the variables used in our analysis, an increase of the share of students aged between 15 and 24 years, the number of graduates between 20 and 29 years and the percentage of the population with at least a higher secondary school qualification tends to indicate an increase in the educational level of a society. Thus, the weights of these variables should be positive.
For the variable “students aged over 30 years” the direction is unclear, because this group tends to be very heterogeneous. The corresponding weight should be positive when the variable mainly captures mature adults engaging in further education. Conversely, it should be negative if the variable mainly reflects the share of long-term students. Finally, an increase in the share of early school leavers is an indication of a decrease in educational performance and therefore the weight is expected to be negative. According to our descriptive results, except for the share of students aged over 30 years, for Germany the variables indicate an improvement in the educational level. For France the overall tendencies are not that clear-cut because the share of students aged 15 and 24 years decreases.
140. As before, we conduct separate PCA for France and Germany and for various subsamples, achieving sensible and robust results (Table 11). As, for France, the number of graduates aged between 20 and 29 years (ISCED 5-6) per 1,000 people of the population is collected irregularly, the results for France are less reliable than those for Germany. Except for the indicator of the relative share of students aged over 30 years where the direction is unclear, all other signs of the weights turn out to match our expectations. The first principal component yields an explanation of the variance of 70 % for Germany and of 93 % for France. According to the KMO value of above 0.65 for Germany and 0.67 for France, the data set warrants a PCA.
140. As before, we conduct separate PCA for France and Germany and for various subsamples, achieving sensible and robust results (Table 11). As, for France, the number of graduates aged between 20 and 29 years (ISCED 5-6) per 1,000 people of the population is collected irregularly, the results for France are less reliable than those for Germany. Except for the indicator of the relative share of students aged over 30 years where the direction is unclear, all other signs of the weights turn out to match our expectations. The first principal component yields an explanation of the variance of 70 % for Germany and of 93 % for France. According to the KMO value of above 0.65 for Germany and 0.67 for France, the data set warrants a PCA.

Posté par pcassuto à 00:00 - - Permalien [#]
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